Category Archives: R’n’R’s’n’B’n’B’s; Rambles and Reflections in Broadways and Byways (of Britain)

Wear or Where Land’s End?

01What do you think of when you read the words “Land’s End”? When I googled them, the first entry that came up was the clothing store. That’s what I used to  03always think of. Right? Trendy, casual but classy clothes…usually mail ordered before heading out into the wild blue wilderness on a trip? When my son Joel worked in the clothing department at Sears before starting graduate school last fall, I was surprised to discover that Sears had bought the Lands’ End product line for US$2 billion cash back in 2002. I was even more intriqued when I 02discovered that Lands’ End was an American company, because I always assumed it was an English company named for Land’s End, the westernmost point in England. What I didn’t realize until we visited England was just how  09magnificent Land’s End is! It’s along the coast of Cornwall, and for any of you who are fans of Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Pirates of Penzance…it’s only about eight miles southwest of that famous little port. It also gained some recognition last summer as the starting point for the 2012 Summer Olympics torch relay. 06Land’s End is noted for fascinating displays of rare flora as well as absolutely 05breath-taking views of the great northern Atlantic, so as you hike along the 04ridges and stairways, keep looking down at all the delicate flowers dancing under your feet as well as off into the distance where the winds are whipping the waves into a frenzy. But if you get a chance…please go! The wild wind, the salty air, the brilliant skies…its rugged splendor conjures up a feeling you’ll never forget!10My guess is that heaven will be even more glorious than we can ever imagine too… so much more than the clothing of this earth, as beautiful as that is. Worth infinitely more, and worth every bit of trouble it takes to find our way there!

“And I, John, saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a great voice out of heaven saying, ‘Behold, the tabernacle of God is with men, and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with them and be their God'” (Revelation 21:2-3).

The Incredibly Creative Brontës of Haworth

Wuthering HeightsWhen I was a girl, few love stories moved me any more than those written by the Jane Eyre Brontë sisters: Emily’s Wuthering Heights, Charlotte’s Jane Eyre, and Anne’s The Tenant  The Tenant of Wildfell Hall….classic stories reflecting the anguish of seemingly impossible love relationships. I think in many ways they had a negative impact The Brontes 2
on my young mind as far as modeling what to look for in a healthy, wholesome 01husband, and it’s taken pretty close to forever to get my head straightened out! 05Naivety aside, on our trip to England with our British Lit aficionado, Kathy Kris, 04along, it just seemed right to visit Haworth, the tiny village on the English moors03 where the Brontë sisters lived in a little parsonage with their parents, sisters, and Bramwell brother, Branwell. The girls’ father was the parson at the “Church of St. Michael
08
and All Angels,” and the church still exists today. Truly, I know nothing about the doctrines of the church, and Rev. Brontë may have been a very godly man (despite his severe looks), but I do know that his son, Branwell, ended up having 06  an affair with “Mrs. Robinson” (the mother of the children he tutored) was summarily dismissed by the father/husband and returned home as a rather desolate alcoholic who died young from T.B. and dissipation. Like hisPainting_of_Brontë_sisters                three sisters, he was an extremely talented young man and a gifted artist, but unlike his sisters, he produced very little that has remained…even erasing his own likeness in the portrait he painted of himself and his sisters. (see above).03The sad plight of the family included the death of their mother to uterine cancer, and eventually  the death of all the children at young ages (none even reached 40) from tuberculosis (and other complications, such as early-stage pregnancy and probably typhoid fever for Charlotte [the only one to marry].)07Hundreds of thousands of “fans” still flock to the moors and museum each year,04and I have to confess that with seven lively offspring who love to write & create, 05the Brontë family has long been somewhat inspirational to us, although—after having visited—I found that the aura of the ideal gave way to a rather sad realization about the true nature of even the most gifted and privileged. We are all made of clay, and our best efforts at creating will be flawed. Without a strong commitment to walking in truth and light, we will ultimately produce little of lasting value.
09I pray that my own children (and Alan and I) will walk in the Light, and that our labors of love will produce enduring, good fruit…and I pray the same for you!10The summer I spent working with missionaries in Scotland (40+ years ago), the milkman delivered fresh milk (un-homogenized…with 2″ of cream at the top) every morning! 🙂 Imagine my delight in discovering that this marvelous tradition is still current today in Haworth! It made me stop and think: If we want to keep growing spiritually, we really need a fresh drink of the Word every day. May we never get to the point where we think we don’t need to meditate on the Bible…that we’ve outgrown it and can survive by indulging our brains in the wines of this world. To keep spiritually sound and emotionally robust, we need daily doses of the fresh, whole, creamy milk of the Word!

“As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the Word, that you may grow thereby” (1 Peter 2:2).

Big Mike, Big Moors, and Sheep Sharing

04  Quintessential English romance—at least to me—is a stay in a snug B’n’B,  IMG_1145 a lavish “full English” (and the very best have fried toast), 03 and a long day’s hike out on the moors. 05We had just such an exhilarating experience near Haworth, England, 07 on the Pennine Moors of West Yorkshire. And, we also found “the perfect” B’nB:06“Big Mike’s” (note his ample frame in the background). His super-sized breakfast 09kept us entirely energized for our 7.5-hour hike across the grand, open country! 10On this particular escapade we had a specific goal: Top Withins, said to be the 11inspiration for Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë, which was one of the first 23major novels I read as a child (besides every Nancy Drew I could get my hands 20on), and had a huge (and somewhat questionable) impact on me. In fact all three The Brontes 2Brontë sisters wrote classic romance novels set in these moors, and so Kathy   14was also very eager to experience their expansive, wild beauty.  12Although I’m sure you could get dreadfully lost out in these ancient, 13somewhat desolate hills, the path is well worn and in most places clearly marked. 16There were sheep grazing everywhere, and although we could walk freely 15 wherever we wished, the pastures were kept secure by a system of styles, gates, 24and old stone fences surrounding the edges of each farmer’s vast lands. 19When we finally reached our destination, we decided it was time for a break to 21rest up and enjoy some tea and  biscuits ( the English name for what we  08Americans call “cookies”). We watched the peaceful lambs, which were grazing 8 nearby, but what we didn’t foresee was that the sheep were keenly aware that  17  all travelers seem to follow this exact same ritual…and they were insistent that 25  we share our tea party with them! Well, what could we say? Sharing is a good thing, and aren’t we all the Lord’s sheep? 🙂 22“For he is our God, and we are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand” (Psalm 95:7). (Like Emily, I may be vexed at times, but I am eternally grateful that the Lord is my shepherd, because he knows how to lead me to green pastures and beside still waters! I’d be totally lost and more barren than the moors without Him!)

Chatsworth: Grandest Country Home in England

01I’m sure those of you who enjoyed the 2005 adaptation of Jane Austen’s Pride  05and Prejudice would love a leisurely day at Chatsworth House, the setting for 03Mr. Darcy’s “Pemberley.” In fact, Chatworth House often wins recognition as 04England’s most popular country home, hosting 300,000+ tourists each season 19on their 35,000-acre estate in North Derbyshire on the River Derwent. 14Construction on the present mansion began in 1553 by the Cavendish family, 11who have been the earls (and later Dukes of Devonshire) since that time. 17Perhaps the most famous was the Sixth Duke (known as the “Bachelor Duke”) 15who was an incredibly energetic and wealthy traveler and visionary. In 1811 (at 08  the age of 21) he inherited the title, Chatsworth, and 7 other major estates in 18England and Ireland that comprised a massive 200,000 acres! I think even Mr. 09 Darcy’s wealth would have been dwarfed by the Bachelor Duke’s holdings. Many 07 famous people are associated with Chatsworth house, including Mary, Queen of 13Scots (who was imprisoned there several times), and Sir Joseph Paxton, who was20 a gardener at Chatworth and also designed London’s Crystal Palace. If you have 06the chance to travel a bit in England, consider a day at Chatsworth. If that’s not 21 an option, but you’d like to see more, Chatsworth House is the subject of a 3-part 12documentary, Chatsworth, produced by BBC and broadcast as Chatsworth 10House in the U.S. by PBS last year (2012). There are many fascinating things to see there…such as this life-sized painting of a violin on a door (but both the violin and the door is simply part of one very realistic painting)! 16For our daughter, who had just earned her M.A. in literature and loves to write novels set in England, our trip was an especially treasured time of both pleasure and learning!

    “When wisdom enters into your heart, and knowledge is pleasant unto your            soul, discretion shall preserve you, understanding shall keep you.”   (Proverbs 2:10-11)

“The heart of the prudent gets knowledge; and the ear of the wise seeks knowledge” (Proverbs 18:15).

Cambridge and the Sheriff of Nottingham

01So, I told you about punting on the River Cam, but I haven’t told you much about Cambridge generally, and even though I might be a bit tempted to slight the old 09school out of loyalty to Oxford and my two sons who studied and taught there, that would hardly be fair! Cambridge is second only to Oxford in revered age 12amongst English-speaking countries and is consistently listed in the top 5 universities around the globe, often ranking as #1 or #2. Their graduates have 14earned 65 Nobel Prizes—more than any other university in the world. So, having Cambridge on your resumé would definitely enhance your chances! 10  Well, back to my account of rambling reflections! When we visited with Aaron and Mike in ’99, we were very interested in the buildings, but upon our return    02in 2005 with Kathy and Daniel, we enjoyed more of the ambiance. Kathy made a delightful scrapbook of our trip, so when you see lovely borders around pictures,  07quotable quotes, or other bits of charm and beauty over the next few Tuesdays, please note that all enhancements are due to the artistry of my beloved daughter! 03We’d all just arrived in London after a red-eye flight across the pond from America, so both Kathy and Dan were too sleep-deprived to be sweet-talked into04 an inspiring punt on the River Cam, although we all really enjoyed a relaxed stroll through the campus and gardens of Cambridge. By lunchtime, we put Alan  06 on the job of employing his keen diagnostic skills of nose and eye to ferret out the perfect combination of aroma and local popularity to provide for a suitably fabulous (and not too expensive) culinary experience. He has impeccable taste!11  I dare say, on our entire trip we never lacked for something scrumptious to eat or an abundance of all things bright and beautiful to enjoy!05

Ah, but by mid afternoon, we were all feeling sleepy and exhausted, so we headed off to Sherwood Forest, hoping for a some good fish’n’chips wrapped in newspapers (as I recalled from my summer in the British Isles 30 years previous) for supper and a comfy place to spend the night in Nottingham. 15 It started to pour, and in the gathering gloom of night we could find no place to eat or sleep for under what seemed  exorbitant prices! (Also, we suspect we eventually wandered into a rather unsavory and possibly dangerous district…not on this elegant old boulevard, but within a mile from this quiet street.)16Finally, we did find a place with  2 tiny rooms in a very old hotel (each for 100 £, which was like $150 USD) and bunked down for the night. 18By the next morning, the rain had stopped, we felt almost human again, and we were  served a delightful breakfast by none other than the Sheriff of Nottingham! 17Well, that wasn’t exactly his title, although he was campaigning for some high office, and for the rest of the trip, it was quite the joke that we’d been endangered during our trek through Sherwood Forest & robbed by the sheriff of Nottingham! 13If there’s some lofty lesson to be learned from this story, I’m sure it would be to search for truth, not primarily at any institution (even Cambridge, as marvelous as it is and whose motto is: “From this place, we gain enlightenment and precious knowledge”), but from the Word of God “that their [our] hearts might be comforted, being knit together in love, and unto all riches of the full assurance of understanding, to the acknowledgment of the mystery of God, and of the Father, and of Christ; in whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Colossians 2:2-3). Amen!08On a more pragmatic note, I would suggest you might consider getting reservations ahead for at least your first night’s stay in a strange city, especially if you’ve been up on a plane all night getting there! 🙂

Madame Tussauds

04Before ending my series on R’n’R’s’nB’nB’s (Rambles and Reflections in Byways and Broadways of Britain), I’m including a few favorite experiences from other visits. Back in 2005, Alan and I took Kathy and Daniel to the British Isles to celebrate Kathy’s completing her M.A. in literature and Dan’s admission into dental school at the University of Michigan. Kathy and I planned most of the trip, but when we got to London, Alan and I asked Daniel to dream up something special that he wanted to see. When he said, “I’d like to see Madame Tussauds!” I probably wrinkled my nose (only inwardly, I hope) before taking a deep breath and saying, “Okay! That’s what we’ll do first thing tomorrow!”05It made me realize that I was a bit of a cultural snob and thought the idea of wasting so much time and money looking at a museum of wax figures depicting movie stars and murderers sounded about as appealing as this guy on the right… 02and when I saw that the admission line rivaled the one for Rome’s Sistine Chapel (read that 1-2 hours), only my deep love for the nut on the left above and my sense of commitment to word & honor kept me from begging our troops to bail. 03In fact, we had a great time! 🙂 Madame Tussauds has about 400 different life- sized figures of many of the most famous and infamous personalities in modern western history, not just film and sports stars, but royalty, political leaders, 01singers…you name it, and you can probably find it…I mean him or her! “Madame Tussaud” was born in Strasbourg, France in 1761, as “Anna Maria Grosholtz.” Her mother worked as the housekeeper for a physician who was skilled in the art or making wax models. Dr. Curtius taught Anna Maria his trade, and when Anna was only 16 she made her first model: a representation of the french philosopher, VoltaireVoltaire. During the French Revolution Anna collected decapitated heads of dignitaries who had been killed and fashioned death masks of them, making her initial claim to fame in a rather dubious  way. In 1802 Dr. Curtius died, leaving his vast collection of models to Anna Maria, and so she spent the next third of a century touring Europe with her wax models. Eventually Anna married (thus the “Madame Tussaud”) and settled down with her museum collection at a permanent location on Baker Street in London, although today it’s nearby on Marylebone Road. We had an awesome time, and Kathy was delighted to note 06 that sometimes small people (like Napoleon Bonaparte) do rule the world. Of 07course, she also felt dwarfed beside some of the literary greats, but that’s okay! 08We all need a little inspiration in life, right?  Would I recommend Madame Tussauds? Sure, if you’ve got some extra time and bucks for fun…and especially if you have a son who’s been patiently good-humored about all your bright ideas!

“But the LORD said to Samuel, ‘Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature, because I have refused him: for the LORD sees not as man sees, for   man looks on the outward appearance, but the LORD looks on the heart’.”           (1 Samuel 16:7)

Punting on the River Cam ala NaPoWriMo

04April is NaPoWriMo, or National Poetry Writing Month, so I thought I’d try my hand at imitating that paramount educational scholar, Dr. Seuss. Of course, it’s also “Travel Tuesday,” and I really want to tell you about a few other special sites in the British Isles before finishing my series affectionately named “R’n’R’s in B’n’B’s.”..or Rambles and Reflections in Broadways and Byways of Britain.  Today I’d planned to recommend punting if you get a chance, relating all the fun Alan and I had when we toured the British Isles with our oldest sons, Aaron and Michael, back in 1999 while Michael was studying at Oxford. Cambridge grew up along the Cam River (“bridge over the River Cam”), and if you go punting there, you will enjoy the beautiful countryside as well as the magnificent buildings of Cambridge University (Oxford’s chief rival!).

03“Punting on the River Cam01Is better than green eggs and ham.02Try! You’ll like it, Sam I am!”   🙂

“And he showed me a pure river of water of life, clear as crystal, proceeding out of the throne of God and of the Lamb” (Revelation 22:1).