Category Archives: Museums and Galleries

The Purpose of Memorials

Two days ago, in reflecting on the solar eclipse, I mentioned that we all like to commemorate special events by taking photos or keeping mementos to help us remember. Does that sound about right for you too? However, I don’t take pictures of miserable things; I take pictures of beautiful things and happy events I want to celebrate. It was in this light that I understood why many people want to take down the statue of Robert E. Lee from Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, and why it was draped in black yesterday (also as an expression of mourning for Heather Heyer).  One insightful reader sent me this note: “…the Confederacy has held a special power over this state. We’ve sort of changed history to make ourselves look better than we really were. We portrayed our losing generals as if they were triumphant in spirit or really on the right side of things – as long as we don’t emphasize the role that slavery played in the war. We might have lost on that point, but it [is] really about our right to be messed with and our right to live how we wanted to live without somebody from somewhere else to tell us how to live. We gave these men the status of heroes and placed their likeness on the footsteps of our courthouses. So every time we went to deal with a matter of the law, somebody white could look upon them and remember that they’re in the right and somebody black can look upon them and know that our history hasn’t died in our hearts. So, if we keep those statues on the steps of the courthouse, aren’t we really endorsing their legacy?”  What a wise reflection. Moving and true! I’ve been to Germany several times, but I’ve never seen a statue of Adolf Hitler, and I’m very glad for that! What if he were still revered in Germany? I would think that deep in their hearts, the German people still believe Hitler was right.  Part of admitting that we’re wrong about something is renouncing it…giving up our right to glory in it and mourning instead. In Germany, there are holocaust memorials so that we will never forget the evil that happened and continue to be horrified rather than attracted to anti-Semitism.  Similarly, there are many war memorials on the Normandy Coast of France. None of them house statues as such; they are filled with photos and information teaching about the devastating effects of war.  At Nagasaki, the memorials don’t exalt leaders, they portray the terrible suffering of the hundreds of thousands who died from the tragic bombings that ended the war, and they cry out for people to find peace. If we’re really sorry about what we’ve done wrong, we won’t be retelling the story and making heroes of those who led us astray. Right?  If I lived in Virginia, I would vote to remove the statues of the leaders who championed slavery. This morning I saw a map of where there are Confederate memorials. I don’t know the exact number, but it looked like over a hundred and possibly hundreds.  I thought back to visiting Tiananmen Square, where hundreds of protestors were killed in 1989. In the little shops all around the square, you can buy statues…of Mao Zedong!  He is still considered a great hero by many in Communist China (even among some Christian young adult Chinese students I know), although I was taught that he was responsible for millions of deaths and a brutal dictator. So, why do they revere him? And, what of Vladimir Lenin’s Mausoleum in front of the Kremlin in Russia? Millions visit every year, celebrating??? After the Iron Curtain came down in 1991, there was a movement to rebury Lenin’s body next to his mother’s grave, but Vladimir Putin “opposed this, pointing out that a reburial of Lenin would imply that generations of citizens had observed false values during 70 years of Soviet rule” (Wiki).

This, I think, is very telling. Memorials celebrate the values of the person being memorialized! Logically, statues of Confederate heroes are memorializing what they fought for, which was slavery. Do we want that commemorated or approved in our country? I hope we do not. To show respect for all races of people, particularly the African Americans who were enslaved, I totally support the idea of removing statues of heroes who stood against racial equality.

Spiritually, there is a personal parallel for each of us. Are we keeping photos or mementos from past events that were negative rather than positive influences on us? Are we “worshiping” icons that represent values we should not be endorsing? Are we beginning to remember “the good old days” of sinful pleasures that were in fact “evil days”? May we repent of all evil—past as well as present—and take glory in God alone, focusing our minds on: “whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things: (Philippians 4:8).

But let him that glorieth glory in this, that he understandeth and knoweth me, that I am the Lord which exercise lovingkindness, judgment, and righteousness, in the earth: for in these things I delight, saith the Lord” (Jeremiah 9:24).

(The photo of Stalin’s Mausolem at the Kremlin was taken by Andrew Shiva via Wiki; the rest our mine, taken in China, Japan, Germany, and France. Not all of them match the text perfectly, but they were the best representations for the ideas that I could find.)

 

 

The Inimitable Biltmore Estate

At 178,926 square feet, the Biltmore—the Vanderbilt family’s 8,000 acre estate— ranks as America’s largest privately owned home, and I’ve wanted to visit for about 50 years, particularly after hearing the rumor that we’re related by marriage to the Vanderbilts (many cousins-removed ago). In the early 2000’s (at the height of our family’s musical ministry), I was negotiating with the Biltmore to sing gospel music there one Sunday afternoon           (which they still do, by the way),  although one of my closest friends ended up planning her wedding for that same weekend, and being in the wedding preempted everything else! Nevertheless, the mystique of America’s grandest estate nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains hovered like mist in the back of my mind, and last May, after visiting many of the gorgeous châteaux along the Loire River in France, several of which were the French Renaissance inspirations for the Biltmore,    such as  Château de Blois,        Château de Chenonceau,         and Château de Chambord,         I realized that a trip to the Biltmore was still on my unconscious bucket list. So, when we attended a conference this May just 15 miles from the Biltmore, you can imagine my excitement to see this romantic tribute  to America’s Gilded Age!  Yesterday I shared photos from the gardens (in conjunction with thoughts for pondering how to overcome your past and fulfill your potential),  but today I want to share a few photos from the inside of this grand home,  which would have made a worthy location for Downton Abbey! The Biltmore Estate has 250 rooms,  including 33 bedrooms, 43 bathrooms, 65 fireplaces,  a dining room table that can seat up to 64 guests,   and many novelties for the 19th century,  such as  a 70,000-gallon heated indoor swimming pool  and one of the nation’s first bowling alleys to be installed in a private residence. Only half of George Vanderbilt’s collection of 22,000 books can fit in his library, and while we were visiting, their was a special exhibition of costumes  and information related to movies that have been made  from some of the many first-edition classic books owned by the Vanderbilts. The Vanderbilt family still live in and operate their estate,  but unlike many European grand estates and palaces, the Vanderbilts allow visitors to take photographs of all the home’s treasures,  including many beautifully preserves tapestries  and gorgeous paintings.  On a sunny day, like the day we visited,  one could easily spend their entire day touring the home,  enjoying lunch at one of their stable-turned restaurant venues,  and exploring their vast gardens.  Although we loved visiting, Alan and I both left thinking
how happy we are to live in our snug little “Tanglewood Cottage.”  I’m not even sure “I want a mansion, just over the hilltop.” Do you?  Actually, I don’t care where I live, just as long as it’s with Jesus!

Jesus said, “As the Father hath loved me, so have I loved you: continue ye in my love. If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love; even as I have kept my Father’s commandments, and abide in his love” (John 15:9-10).

“Mansion Over The Hilltop”

“I’m satisfied with just a cottage below
A little silver and a little gold
But in that city where the ransomed will shine
I want a gold one that’s silver lined.

Don’t think me poor or deserted or lonely
I’m not discouraged I’m heaven bound.
I’m but a pilgrim in search of the city
I want a mansion, a harp and a crown.

I’ve got a mansion just over the hilltop
In that bright land where we’ll never grow old
And some day yonder we will never more wander
But walk on streets that are purest gold.” (Ira Stanphill)

(All photos, except the four related to our trip to France last May, were taken this May on our visit the the Biltmore Estate, near Ashville, North Carolina.)

Rise Up, My Love (234): In the Galleries

Song of Solomon 7:5 “The king is held in the galleries.” Did you have the first reaction I had to this phrase? As an American, the word “galleries” brings to mind art galleries, and my mind drifted back to some of the most beautiful paintings I’ve ever been privileged to see, both here and abroad…paintings of Christ walking the Emmaus road, and the beautiful light of a Reuben depicting Jesus as a small boy watching Joseph hard at work in his carpentry shop. “The king is held in the galleries.” My mind returned to a time when I was “held in the galleries” of the Detroit Institute of Art for several years…during those long, hard years when my husband was in medical school. Our oldest son cut his teeth on the world’s great classic artists, whiling away the hours with me in the metropolitan museums that were just a short little red-wagon ride away from our apartment. Holding my firstborn in my arms, I used the paintings as superb visuals for lessons on vocabulary and life while answering his persistent questions: “Wha’ dat? wha’ dat? wha’ dat?” While he began developing childish impressions of what such words as “man, horse, river, and boat” meant, I developed a deeper appreciation for the creative genius of a God who could bless his creatures with such amazing talents! Truly, we were “held in the galleries.” We were totally captivated by wonder and beauty. Could the king have been so captivated by exploring the “galleries” of his beloved’s mind? Most women would be delighted to think so…because most women long to have their husbands think that their minds—and not just their bodies—are beautiful and worth exploring! For example, I once heard of a woman who wanted to hear a marriage proposal that would go something like this: “I’m so crazy about you that I want to be able to wake up at 6:00 a.m. some mornings just to find out what you’re thinking about!” Sound strange? Not to a woman. Once during our family’s end-of-the-school-year vacation we read together A Severe Mercy, the autobiographical account of the tremendous love and loyalty a couple developed for each other, how they came to Christ, and how they dealt with illness and death. One of the greatest appeals of the book was the intimacy and devotion the couple attained—truly their marriage was a noble human portrait of the love relationship Christ desires with each of us as his bride.

They developed the concept of a “shining barrier” to keep all competing loves at bay. They aspired to total trust and faithfulness…total sharing…total intimacy. Perhaps the greatest key to this beautiful love was the commitment to share all their thoughts and ideas. They tried to read everything the other person read and to share all their experiences in common. They allowed themselves to become willing captives of one another’s minds. Is this what the king meant? Possibly. The text is not explicit, and it is one of the many points where commentators struggle for meaning. The word gallery has a long history. It can be traced back to the middle English galerie, from the Italian galleria, from Medieval Latin galeria, which was perhaps a variant of the word galilaea, a term referring to the porch of a church, thought to be from Galilee.* If indeed the word goes back to church “galleries,” then it most likely refers to the upper floor: in today’s parlance, the “balcony.” One can just picture a church porch or balcony overlooking the beautiful Sea of Galilee! This is another pleasing possibility, and it fits in well as a parallel idea to our first thought, that the king is held captive in the “balcony” of her brain.   “Thine head upon thee is like Carmel…the king is held in the galleries.” Or, paraphrased for today: “Your head is your crowning glory…the king is mesmerized by all he sees in you!” Like an eager parishioner, leaning forward over the edge of the railing to hear every word the minister speaks…like the king in his royal balcony box enjoying every moment of the performance unfolding before him…..like a scholar intrigued by the seemingly endless possibilities for delight as he pours over the fascinating, leather-bound tomes in the upper recesses of a priceless library…so Solomon—picturing Christ, the matchless lover of our souls—remains in the “balcony,” intently gazing at his wife’s beautiful face and studying her mind!

(Morris, 539)

Ever Looking for a Quiet Place for a Retreat? Consider “The Cove!”

Have you ever had a twinge of envy that monks can live in solitude and enjoy a lifetime immersed in prayer and meditation? Twenty years ago, Alan and I had a friend who spent one week every year at a monastery down in Kentucky, and that seemed wonderfully appealing, although it never seemed practical with a brood of children to tend. However, a quiet retreat space struck us as almost utopian in appeal, so you can imagine our amazement and joy when we discovered just such a retreat opportunity in the Blue Ridge Mountains near Asheville, North Carolina. We were on our way “home” (to our conference site) after visiting the Biltmore Estate, when we just happened to notice a sign for Billy Graham’s “The Cove.” Somewhere in the back of my mind I knew there was a Billy Graham Library
and thought there might be some sort of museum related named The Cove, so I asked Alan if we could at least see how far it would be from the main road. As a matter of fact, if you get off I-40 at Exit 55 and turn right, it’s right there! Wow! We were totally enthralled! Tickets to the Biltmore are $65. At The Cove, we just drove in and were treated to a royal tour of their chapel… for free! Kindly volunteers explained the mission and work of Billy Graham, and introduced us to a small but impressive collection of photos concerning his lifetime ministry. Alan and I both became Christians (along with millions of others) through the ministry of Billy Graham, so it was especially meaningful to see photos from his first and last crusades. (Our son Jonathan attended his last ministry in NYC back in 2005.)A collage of photos also gave us a small, sweet window into Billy’s family life. Afterward, we were offered time to enjoy the Chatlos Memorial Chapel,
where people are welcome to play the piano or organ, sit on the chairs, or worship God standing at their 400-year-0ld English pulpit!Everyone who comes is also free to visit their prayer room, or pray while wandering through Ruth Graham’s Prayer Garden. And, people are invited to stay as long as they please. Before leaving, volunteers share the gospel (John 3:16) via a gorgeous painting
and give visitors the opportunity to write out prayer requests, which are gathered and will be prayed over at least 5 times. Our guide also prayed for us before we left. Praise God!

I don’t know if unbelievers might find this uncomfortable, but we absolutely loved the way everything was presented and didn’t find anyone intrusive or the atmosphere pressured at all.

The whole experience was one of kindness, openness,
and a warm invitation for visitors to stop and rest awhile, enjoying the presence of God, which is almost palpable there.

Before we left, we also learned that there are on-going opportunities throughout the year for personal retreats, spiritual enrichment sessions with some of America’s finest theologians, and concerts by Christian musicians. Their 1,200 acre campus also includes a youth camp and other opportunities as well as their lovely Bible conference center. Did you know? I didn’t! Would you like to go sometime? I would love to! Maybe we’ll see you there.  🙂(For more information, visit TheCove.org or call 1-800-950-2092. You might accuse me of advertising, and I guess I am, but it’s because I’d never even heard of The Cove and feel like it’s the kind of place where your soul and spirit will be truly nurtured at a charitable price! If you’re really broke, they even offer applications for scholarships.)

(I took all the photos at The Cove on May 4, 2017.)

Birthday Club: In Pursuit of Beauty and Light

“We ought to think of our initial encounter with God in terms of beauty, in which God appears to us…He gives himself to us before we even know the right question to ask” (D.C. Schindler).*    It isn’t often you get to visit your daughter’s senior art exhibition. In fact, it’s never happened to me, but for our Birthday Club outing to honor Cindi this year, we took a trip to Spring Arbor to see her daughter’s capstone project, an art exhibition at the Ganton Art Gallery of Spring Arbor University. When we visited, Ilsa and three other graduating seniors had artwork on display.Our Birthday Club usually has some surprises along the way, though, so our first stop was a visit with Cindi’s parents, who are considering a move to GR. This awesome couple sponsored our CMS (Christian Medical Society) group when Alan was in medical school 40 years ago, so it’s been a special joy to get reacquainted with them via my long-term friendship with their daughter. Spring Arbor is a couple of hours east of GR, so had needed a coffee break on our road trip at the “Coffee Barrel” in Holt, Michigan. If you’re a coffee lover and live near or pass through, it’s definitely worth a visit!We met Cindi’s daughter for lunch at Lazeez, where they have excellent Indian cuisine. It was fun to chat with the owner and discover we have mutual friends!  Josh and Amy Gelatt now live in this area, and Josh is the pastor of Cascades Baptist Church in Jackson, MI, but we all attended the same church years ago. It’s such a small world! (These plaques adorn the wall by the register at Lazeez.)We all love savory Indian cuisine, and the ginger chai tea is especially delicious!     After lunch Ilsa gave us a very gracious tour of the gallery and her artwork. I’ve known Ilsa since she was a little girl. She’s always been gifted and artistic. I was very impressed by the variety of her mediums, her creativity, and her skill.       Some of her ideas were absolutely brilliant and worthy of copyrighting.              Many of her pieces had interesting stories and were provocative. Some made really good points…like this one. That’s not chips on her shoulder, it’s a physical representation (if I understood vaguely correctly) of the softness of human beings but the fact that we all have rough edges too.  As we pondered her artwork, I remembered something from a chapel service that one of my sons said recently, “We’re disadvantaged as a community as we head into this brave new world because  we haven’t reflected theologically and systematically as we perhaps should on symbolic reality. Now is our chance to change that. I  invite you and encourage you to explore symbolic reality, symbolic theology” (Dr. Jonathan J. Armstrong, Moody Bible Institute). Jon is a big fan of modern art, although I’ve not been. Maybe I need to visit more art galleries! (BTW, Ilsa’s exhibit is gone, but there are four new exhibits now.) Admission to the Ganton Art Gallery is free, but no matter where you live, you’re probably not too far from some fascinating artwork via student exhibitions, private and public galleries. If you live in Grand Rapids but are broke, there are “Free Meijer Days” at the Grand Rapids Art Museum on Tuesdays 10-5 and on Thursdays from 5-9 pm.                                            I have to say, many of Ilsa’s pieces were rather unsettling
(which was her intention, I’m sure).        I’m much more drawn to the beauty God paints, so full of color and light!However, I was taken with many of Ilsa’s “Fantastic Fiends,” because I noticed the light emanating from within them and remembered this saying:  “Beautiful light is born of darkness, so the faith that springs from conflict is often the strongest and best.”~R. TurnbullAnd so, I wish light and beauty for all of us, but for those who are struggling to find light in the darkness, I pray that you may find some beautiful light born of darkness, and a deep faith that springs from conflict!But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light” (1 Peter 2:9, ESV).

I have come into the world as light, so that whoever believes in me may not remain in darkness” (Jesus speaking in John 12:46, ESV).

(*D.C. Schindler, author of The Catholicity of Reason; Pontifical John Paul II Institute at the Catholic University of America. Both Dr. Schindler and Dr. Armstrong’s comments are from Jon’s recent chapel address (which is fascinating) and can be found here (although you might need to rewind it to the beginning):  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFTTi_7WC_0&feature=youtu.be

ArtPrize 8: Just Where is the Rising of the Sun?

the-more-you-sweat-in-practice-the-less-you-bleed-in-battle-artprize-8-kathryn-w-armstrongArtPrize 8 is off and running! I’ve had several friends wander into the Holiday Inn without realizing that my mural is there, so let me give you the details in case you’re in GR and planning to go to ArtPrize, because I’d love to see you and I’d hate to miss you! My entry is titled “From the Rising of the Sun” and is being displayed at the Holiday Inn at 310 Pearl St NW, Grand Rapids, MI 49504.

gerald-r-ford-museumIt’s opposite the Gerald Ford Museum, van-andel-museum-center-jpgacross the street from the Van Andel (Grand Rapids Public Museum), devos-learning-centerand kitty corner from Ah-Nab-Awen Park.

grand-riverIt’s just across the river (0.2 miles) from the Amway Grand, so it’s at the cross roads to some of the best art in town. It’s also just 0.4 miles from Grand Rapids Art Museum, 0.5 miles from the B.O.B. (Grand Rapids’ “Big Old Building), and 0.6 miles from DeVos Place, so it’s super convenient for the most popular venues! arriving-at-the-holiday-inn     Whether you go in the front or back entrance,  you’ll see half the mural.artprize-8-front-lobby-mural-at-holiday-inn “January through June” is at the front entrance, and “June through December” is at the back entrance. Using 400 of my favorite  photographs from around the world, I’ve created a collage trying to tell the story of life on Planet Earth through the seasons of one year and one lifetime. artprize-mural-summer-to-winterHere’s my “Artist Statement: “The top row reminds us of the universal constants we all experience: the glorious sun and moon, rising and setting with comforting precision. Row two showcases another global experience, the beauty of flowers, which can be found everywhere around the globe. Row three highlights the experience of fauna through the seasons. Row four looks more closely at how the flora and individual homes are affected by seasonal changes, using photographs from our cozy “Tanglewood Cottage” here in Grand Rapids. Row five takes an intimate look into one person and one family (mine) through the seasons of one year and one lifetime, but my hope is that it resonates with the emotions and cultural experiences of everyone who views it: birth, growth, adulthood, marriage (or family life; I know some never marry), new life and enjoying grandchildren, growing older, and finally, in the December of life, walking into a sea of clouds on the mountain top, looking hopefully to a glorious future life after we leave Planet Earth.january-of-the-year-artprize-8The lower half of the mural is arranged in ten collages, each comprised of twenty photographs from around the world on a particular theme that compliments the season above.”   artprize-8-from-the-rising-of-the-sunThis is my hope and prayer for the mural: “From the rising of the sun on the day we take our first breath until we walk into life’s sunset, I hope the beauty of our world lifts our hearts to praise the One who created us and provided such a glorious home.” friends-stopping-by-to-see-from-the-rising-of-the-sun-mural-artprize-8I have a booklet with notes on each photograph for anybody who comes and would like to know more detail, although if I’m there when you come, I can answer questions! I’d really love to see you if you come, and if you leave me a message in the comment box or on Facebook (message works too), I’ll try to make sure I’m there when you come! I’ve been going about 10:00-5:00 Monday-Friday every day, but I’ll be less regular on weekends due to family responsibilities and fun, although I’ll still be there at times, so please don’t be shy! It’s a real highlight of my day when friends drop by!

from-the-rising-of-the-sun-mural-artprize-8“From the rising of the sun unto the going down of the same,
the Lord’s name is to be praised” (Psalm 113:3).

The World’s Largest (and Most Luscious?) Museum: Musée du Louvre

standing-in-front-of-the-louvre-museum-parisWhether you experience April in Paris—or Paris in any other season—courtyard-of-loure save a day for the world’s largest (and some say grandest) museum, the Louvre. passageway-to-louvre-museum-courtyardOne could easily get lost in thought within for a week, courtyard-of-the-louvrebut the Louvre deserves at least its own day. ancient-man-at-british-museum-in-londonDon’t do what we did in London years ago! We took a London Bus tour of the city, stopping at various attractions throughout the day, and we were left with only 50 minutes at the end of the day to see the entirety of the British Museum, rosetta-stone-british-museumwhich meant a race to the Rosetta Stone, Elgin Marbles, Oxus Treasure, and Mummy of Katebet, leaving most of their other 8 million works unseen. elgin-marbles-the-british-museumNOT GOOD! (We did rectify such unconscionable inattention on later visits.) la-venus-de-milo-louvreInstead, take time to appreciate the beauty of the Louvre’s timeless treasures. foyer-of-the-louvre-museum-paris If you go, it will be an unforgettable experience! crowds-in-the-louvreAlthough there’s no avoiding the approximate 15,000 tourists who visit daily,
go first thing in the morning,groupe-imperial-en-mars-et-venus-louvre and when your mind starts to fog and your legs ache, lunch-at-the-louvre-cafestop for a leisurely lunchstatuary-on-balcony-cafe-at-the-louvre at their cafe overlooking the museum’s courtyard. view-from-the-cafeteria-of-the-louvre-courtyardThe Louvre contains 380,000+ objects and 35,000+ works of art,spiral-staircase-in-atrium-of-louvre which are showcased in eight major areas within
the 652,000 square-foot former palace of the French kings.aphrodite-louvreBecause one day isn’t sufficient to see everything, you have to pick and choose. lorenzo-lotto-venice-1480-the-woman-caught-in-adultery-louvreI love oil paintings, especially those depicting biblical stories,saint-jean-baptiste-leonardo-de-vinci and there are hundreds of those! le-tibre-louvreJoel loves sculpture, so we all stood mesmerized before many a statue! napoleon-iii-apartments-at-louvreAnother favorite for all of us were the Napoleon III Apartments…ceiling-painting-in-napoleon-iii-apartments-at-the-louvregilded glory retained from the days of Napoleon.staircase-leading-to-nike-of-samothrace-louvreThere are some “must sees,” like the Hellenistic Era masterpiece,  nike-of-samothrace-winged-victory-louvreNike of Samothrace.crowds-photographing-mona-lisa-at-the-louvreOf course, you’ll want to be sure to see the Mona Lisa by Leonardo de Vinci…
not because it’s the world’s most beautiful painting (at least in my mind),
but because it’s the world’s most valuable (insured for about 780 million). mona-lisa-leonardo-da-vinci-louvreConjecturing about enigmatic smiles aside, I’m not sure why this painted lady is the most famous and sought after, but that’s where I want to leave us for today…
pondering what makes something most famous and sought after. carved-casket-louvreHave you ever thought about what makes something precious to you? crowd-in-front-of-mona-lisa-louvreAlthough I’m not one of those who particularly treasures
the world’s most famous lady, “Mona Lisa,” I am totally at one
with the billions who treasure the world’s most famous man.diademe-de-limperatrice-eugenie-louvre-212-pearls-1998-diamonds-paris-1853-louvreThis pearl of greatest price is Jesus, and I revere him above everything else on earth, but not simply because he’s the most famous man in the world. titien-les-pelerins-demmaus-louvre(However, is actually is! Over 2.2 billion people claim his name,
and even the 1.6 billion Muslims at least believe in him as a great prophet!)la-crucifixion-andrea-di-bartolo-solario-lourvreJesus Christ is precious because He loves us. He loved us enough to die for us. bonicacio-depitati-bonifacio-veroneses-the-sacred-family-with-the-saints-louvreJesus is more than man. He is “Emmanuel”… “God with us,”…”God in flesh.” les-mysteres-de-la-passion-du-christ-antonio-campi-louvreJesus  lived a sinless life and died on the cross to save all who come to him in faith, asking him for forgiveness.lorenzo-costa-saint-veronica-with-jesus-graveclothesThis God-man, Jesus Christ, rose from the dead, diadem-j-c-canosa-louvrelives today, and is coming again to reign over all the earth! saint-michel-terranssant-le-demon-raphaelIt’s all there at the Louvre! Isn’t that wonderful?  the-wedding-at-cana-veronese-les-noces-de-cana-louvreThe kingdom of heaven is like unto a merchant man, seeking goodly pearls: Who, when he had found one pearl of great price, went and sold all that he had, and bought it” (Matthew 13:45-46).  crowds-viewing-the-mona-lisa-at-the-louvreAre you ready to “sell all” to obtain Jesus, the Pearl of Great Price?

(I took all the photos of and at the Louvre last May except the 3 from the British Museum, which I took about 12 years ago.)