Category Archives: Gardening

Rise Up, My Love (209): Where are You Twining your Vine?

The Sea of GalileeSong of Solomon 6:11 “I went down into the garden of nuts to see the fruits of the valley, and to see whether the vine flourished, and the pomegranates budded.” First, the bride looked to see if she could see any fruit in the valley. Next, she looked to see “whether the vine flourished.” Notice that it is not “vines” as in many vines in a vineyard, but just one vine.   secret-garden-mackinac-island-9-18-05From John 15 we know that Christ is the true vine and we are the branches. How quickly reading about the vine flourishing brings to mind thoughts of believers abiding in Christ! The bride concerns herself not only with seeking new fruits for her Lord, but with the growth of the vine already established in the garden…the growth of the Church, the body of Christ. Indeed, the bride is the body of Christ here on earth. To go into the garden to examine the vine makes me think of going into a quiet place alone before God and prayerfully examining my own life. Am I flourishing? Am I abiding in Christ? Am I receiving an unobstructed flow of his Spirit, or is there any crushing weight of sin that has partially broken off my attachment to the vine? As I put forth delicate new tendrils, are they attaching firmly to the sturdy supports provided by the husbandman, or are the young shoots of my new growth waving free in the breeze…aimlessly waiting for any handy support?  garden-in-bunratty-folk-park-irelandDo you know much about vines? I still don’t know much, but I learned a little from planting a grape arbor along the fence around our swimming pool. The branches of the grape vines aren’t very smart! They don’t naturally seem to attach themselves to the sturdy fence provided. After returning from a vacation and inspecting my vines that June, I noticed that many of the young shoots were growing straight up into the air toward the sun, and one had wound its way tightly around a young nectarine tree that was planted nearby.  twining-vines-and-a-frogHow like humans, I thought! How often—particularly in our youthful ignorance— we tend to wave about in the breeze of life like the tendrils of young plants, just looking for someone or some group to shower us with sunny approval. Too often we go to the “highest bidder”…whoever pays the most attention or makes us feel most important, rather than bending down in humility and attaching ourselves to the sturdy fence “beneath” us (usually parents and other God-given guides). And yet, to be truly productive, we must learn to lean on our supports and abide in the Vine.  climbing-roses-on-a-brownstone-cottage-cotswold-englandEven after we’ve matured somewhat, we’re in still greater need of support, or we’ll never be able to “bear the weight of glory” so to speak…including the horrific pressures of bringing up children. Beyond that, think of all the people who’ve become prominent in society and then failed miserably. Even many extremely gifted Christians come apart at the seams when given lime light. Like fruit trees heavy with promise, their branches literally break under the load, and they lose much of the precious crop that was ripening within them. Trees that have lost branches are more open to infections. Sometimes the damage is so great that the entire tree becomes diseased and dies, or has to be pruned out of the orchard lest the infection spreads.

Isn’t that the way life is? Tenderly, I took the new shoots, carefully weaving them in and out of the fence. The ones that had grown straight up for too long were inflexible and commonly, despite my best efforts, would break off or require tying to retrain them. The shoot that had wound its way tightly around the nectarine had to be broken off completely, lest it choke the young nectarine. Ah, how our like our human tendency to reach up for glory or attach ourselves to someone or something else beside the one true God. Brokenness, retraining, wasted time, and sometimes a severe loss of life or limb. Such is our lot when we are wayward, for the Lord does promise to prune and chasten all whom he loves  (Revelation 3:19). He works with us so that we’ll become fruitful!peaches-in-the-sun

Rise Up, My Love (207): Searching in the Garden

beatrix-potters-home-hill-top-lake-district-englandSong of Solomon 6:11 “I went down into the garden to see…” The first thing that strikes me about her plan is that she is not taking responsibility for making any of these things happen; she is simply checking to see if they are happening. As believers, we cannot force springtime in the souls of men; we cannot make fruit; we can only attend the fruit as it develops.   apple-blossomsThis is of utmost importance as we begin seeking to work in our Lord’s vineyard. How often Christians, in their enthusiasm to serve Christ, begin recklessly trying to force the manufacture of fruit by their own efforts. We can’t make believers any more than the bride could have made the pomegranates bud. We must understand that God is the husbandman, and the Holy Spirit is the one who imparts life and growth.   applesOne of the most striking lessons I learned as a new Christian (and many times since) was my own helplessness to produce spiritual fruit in my life. My pastor used to say that too many young Christians, like clumsy little children, try to color paper fruits, cut them out, and paste them on in an unsuccessful attempt to hide their spiritual immaturity and barrenness. These are the babes in Christ who want to appear as strong warriors for the sake of impressing others, or worse yet, these are sometimes the hypocrites who smile on the outside while spitting on the inside…insincere people with no true hunger for God, just a desire to curry man’s favor. Better to wait humbly for the true budding of the vine that results from feeding on the Bible. Trying to look spiritual for pride’s sake never works!   gathering-fruitHowever, God does promise that he will give grace to the humble (James 4:6) and that He will fill those who sincerely hunger and thirst after righteousness (Matthew 5:6). This is not to say that we are not responsible for preparing the soil of our hearts, watering it with his word, planting the seeds of truth within our hearts, and vigorously pulling out the weeds of sin as they appear. Yes, we have many responsibilities, and as St. Augustine said: “Strive manfully; habit is overcome by habit.”   apple-tree-loaded-with-apples-in-fallWe are indeed accountable to God for our behavior, but spiritual fruit is something different. Let’s consider again for a minute the fruits of the Spirit that we studied in detail earlier (Galatians 5:22-23). Spiritual fruit is earmarked by characteristics that are totally the opposite of the natural inclinations of the flesh…attitudes of true love, joy, peace, patience, faith, humility, self-control, gentleness, and goodness.   ripe-apples-on-tree-after-rainWe are accountable to God for doing the right things, and by acts of our will, we can do the right things, but how often we wrestle with our hearts! It is only God who can purify our hearts and make our attitudes right! We may water and tearfully sow, but it is God who gives the increase (I Corinthians 3:6-9).   child-picking-raspberries“I went down into the garden of nuts to see the fruits of the valley, and to see whether the vine flourished, and the pomegranates budded.” Strengthened and inspired by the communion and praise of her husband, the bride—for the first time—takes the initiative…not in seeking her beloved, but in seeking fruit from their orchards.   picking-applesPreviously, the bridegroom called his beloved out to “rise up and come away.” He had entreated her to come with him in seeking fruit, but now—a full circle of seasons later—the bride chooses on her own to seek fruit. It is again springtime, but this time her love is mature. She is not just a tender, flowering tree but a fruitful tree. Just as the fragrant apple tree produces no fruit for the first years after it’s planted, so the bride had no fruit until she matured. Now she is mature. She is no longer a tender-eyed bride that must be coaxed along; she is a blazing tower of strength and purpose, “terrible as an army with banners.” And so, she chooses to do something to please her Lord.

This is a profound contrast to the last series of choices she made. Think back to chapter five. What does she say of herself there? “I sleep; I have put off my coat; I have washed my feet…” and finally, after tarrying until it was too late: “I opened to my beloved; but my beloved had withdrawn himself, and was gone.” And then, the terrible search, “I sought him; I could not find him; I called him, but he gave me no answer.” From this attitude of lethargy and self-centeredness …through the life-or-death struggle that ensued, the bride emerged as gold tried by the fire, refined and proclaiming: “The Lord is my God.” (Zechariah 13:9).” This seasoned, tempered vessel was the one who now says, “I went down into the garden of nuts.”

A Hidden Garden in Grand Rapids

Grandpa's GardenNot everyone has the brilliance and budget to develop a Giverny Aquilegia (Columbine)(or maybe no one), but just a few days after we’d returned home from Europe, Alan, Daniel, and IDaniel and Brianna had us over for dinner, and then
—knowing how much I love gardens—Hostas Galore!+they took us to see a beautiful garden in their neighborhood. Hostaholic Lives Here SignThis amazing garden has over 1,000 hostas growing, Hosta Garden. 2plus dozens of flowering perennials that can tolerate shade.  Statue in Hosta GardenI was totally surprised (but delighted), Clematisbecause we’ve walked through the neighborhood many a time, Alan with Samuel in Hosta Gardenstrolling Baby Samuel after dinner, Hosta Garden. 5and none of us had never noticed this hidden treasure before!Bug on a bench(Of course, it is in their neighbors’ back yard.) Dan and Brianna in Hosta GardenApparently our kids’ next-door-neighbors knew about it and invited Dan and Brianna to view the gardens…who in turn invited us, because—as it turns out— Hosta Garden. 9the couple who owns the gardenRhododendronsare very willing to share all the beauty they’ve created! Hosta Garden. 6It was like visiting a lovingly tended botanical garden! Pooh Bear HostaEach type of hosta was neatly labeled, and everywhere we turned Native hydrengeathere was something to delight our eyes. Decorative bugs on tableIt was obviously designed with their grandchildren in mind too, Face on a treebecause there were lots of playful touches. Grandma's Garden of HostasThe lady of the home toured us around Hosta Careand was super gracious about discussing the plants, Columbinehappily dispensing tips on how to care for shade-loving species Hummingbird Feederand even answering questions about how to attract and care for hummingbirds! Hosta Garden. 7I stood in awe of her willingness to share the fruit of all her hard work Solomon's Sealand wisdom with total strangers! Hosta Garden. 10To keep the garden free of weeds,Hosta garden 17they literally go through on their hands and knees weeding! Hosta Garden. 8When we returned home, Dan and Brianna’s next-door-neighbor was up on a ladder repairing something, and he filled in the details. Pink AzaleasApparently the owners of the hidden hosta garden started their work
20 years ago when their daughter was graduating from high school. Hosta Garden. 4The family had tall trees in their big backyard, and between the children
and the trees, the grass just couldn’t thrive in the shade, Primroses and Columbine in Springleaving the area pretty bleak and muddy (which is obviously no longer true!).Hosta Garden 13In order to have a beautiful setting for their daughter’s graduation party, Hosta Garden. 12they planted some hostas…and one thing led to another. Peonies“Quite the love story!” the neighbor reflected. Indeed! Hosta Garden. 11And, one that I’ve thought a lot about this past week. Hosta GardenImagine if every believer cleaned up the mud and mess in the backyards of our lives so that our kids would be glad to have their friends over. Hosta Garden 16Imagine searching through our lives as couples on our knees, rooting out sins!Hosta Garden. 3Imagine having such beautiful lives Statue of a lady with waterthat neighbors notice and tell other neighbors and bring them over to visit!Ceramic Toadstools in a gardenImagine being that open to having people just drop in out of the blue, Azaleas. Orangeand being willing to share the fruit of our spiritual lives…of being willing to take time to explain what we’ve learned and “how to” grow in grace. Chipmunks. Ceramic statuesWow. Have I ever got a long way to go!   Listening to gardenerBut in your hearts revere Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect” (1 Peter 3:15).

Monet’s Glorious Giverny in Spring

Gorgeous colors at Giverny. France. 05.09.16Kathy asked yesterday which site in France was our favorite. Kaleidoscope of Colors at Giverny. France. 05.09.16Wow! That’s a hard one! Mt. Saint Michel 05.13.16Alan said Mont St. Michel, and there’s definitely something to that!Monet's Home at Giverny. France. 05.09.16 I feel like we came home with a lifetime of unforgettable memories, Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16and that narrowing it down to one favorite is nigh unto impossible Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 1given the uniqueness of the various scenic places. Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 20However, for an over-the-top sensory experience in color, texture, fragrance— Bird at Giverny. France. 05.09.16even sound…Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 9in fact, pure, unmitigated beauty everywhere I turned, Kathi at GivernyI would vote for Giverny, Artful Abandon at Giverny. France. 05.09.16 the sublimely riotous gardens so artistically designed by Claude Monet.Claude Monet. Wiki public domainMonet (1840-1926) was the great father of Monet. Painting of his lily pond—and most prolific contributor to—French impressionistic painting.  Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 7Ten years ago, Alan and I visited the fantastic gardens of GivernySpring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 14 with two of our kids (Kathy and Jonathan), Givernyand we were enthralled. Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 21Five years ago, I reflected on those visions of glorySpring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 17 while visiting Manito Park in Spokane, Washington with Jon’s family  Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 19(https://kathrynwarmstrong.wordpress.com/2011/09/10/monets-giverny-reflections-of-glory/).Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 24This May, Alan and I visited again, this time with our two youngest, Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 13Stephen and Joel, and I have to say that if anything, Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 23Giverny is even more than ever an unforgettable kaleidoscope of color Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 8and perfumes! Japanese Bridge lush with wisteria at Giverny. France. 05.09.16The Japanese bridge over Monet’s lily pond Lily pond by Claude Monet at Giverny. France. 05.09.16(basis for his most famous paintings) Wisteria at Giverny. France. 05.09.16was bursting with exuberant wisteria, Tulips and Forget-me-nots at Giverny. France. 05.09.16and cheerful beds of tulips interlaced with forget-me-nots Columbine and forget-me-nots at Giverny. France. 05.09.16and a profusion of other spring-blooming plants Paths beside the lily pong at Giverny. France. 05.09.16were joyfully overflowing their bounds along every path. Sitting on bench at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 14We could have sat transfixed for hours at any resting place Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 2without ever taking in all the intricacies right before my eyes. Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 5Even if I possessed all the money in the world, Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 29I couldn’t imagine or produce such a magnificent display of brilliant color. Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 11The impact was so overwhelming that I just found myself laughing Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 27and blinking my eyes, Kathi on bridge at Giverny. France. 05.09.16like I’d walked into a Thomas Kinkade painting of heaven! Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 12In fact, it did make me think of heaven, Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 6which will be more glorious Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 26and exotic Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 10and dazzlingly beautiful Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 4than we can imagine. Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 16Are you ready? Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16. 30Even so, come, Lord Jesus!

Giverny. France. 05.09.16Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also. And whither I go ye know, and the way ye know. Thomas saith unto him, Lord, we know not whither thou goest; and how can we know the way? Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.” (John 14:1-16)Tulips Spring flowers blooming at Giverny. France. 05.09.16.(Yes, all these photos are from Giverny, taken a couple of weeks ago [except for the photo of Claude Monet from Wiki, and Mont St. Michel, taken a few days later]. May is perhaps the most beautiful time to visit!)

The Spectacular Japanese Garden at Meijer

Meijer Garden ConservatoryIt’s a great privilege to travel around the world Frederik Meijer Garden 2 seeing some of the most stunning gardensda Vinci's Horse Meijer Garden and sculpture parks on earth, Examining da Vinci's horse's foot at  Meijer Garden but it’s an even greater privilege to live with one nearly in your backyard! Frederik Meijer Garden A few weeks ago, Frederik Meijer Gardens Japanese Garden at Frederik Meijer opened their new 22 million-dollar addition that’s taken 7 years to imagineer:Frederik Meijer Japanese Garden 2 A Japanese Garden, which (at least in my mind), Sunset at Meijer Garden has catapulted Meijer into the realm of stardom. Frederik Meijer Japanese Garden 3The Japanese Garden is a potpourri of visual delights Rocks. Flowers. Water. Japanese Tea Garden Meijerwhere rocks, flowers, and waters reside,Waterfalls at Meijer Japanese Tea Garden slide, Frederik Meijer Japanese Garden 7 collide… Meijer Japanese Garden. Stephen and Joel find peace, Frederik Meijer Japanese Garden 5and reflect the sky. Iris at Japanese Garden. Meijer copyThe flowers are spectacular, Bonsai at Frederik Meijer Japanese Garden and there are many exotic plants Water lilies and lotus blossoms at Frederik Meijer Japanese Garden garnered from around the world. Taking Family to Meijer GardenThe Japanese Garden is captivating to all ages, too! Zen GardenAlthough many of the displays must not be touched, Bench at Frederik Meijer Japanese Gardenthere are places where kids can climb (or adults can sit and meditate), Boy at Meijer Japanese Tea Gardenand there are good maps available to help inquiring minds learn more, What is Coming is Uncertaintylook harder, and decipher some of the messages which are written in stone. Frederik Meijer Japanese GardenOne of the lessons I learned wasn’t written in stone, Frederik Meijer Japanese Garden Sculpturebut it occurred to Linda and me as we admired some beautifully polished rocks. Sun low in sky at Japanese Tea Garden. MeijerGod, the great designer and creator, intends for each of us  Sun setting over Meijer Japanese Tea Garden to become like a gorgeous garden Frederik Meijer Garden where others can find refreshment and delight. Daisies at Meijer GardenAlthough some people are lovely by natural giftedness, Meijer Garden Sculptureit takes the touch of the Master’s hand to make us into something spectacular. Frederik Meijer Japanese Garden Sculpture 2“In the shadow of his hand hath he hid me, and made me a polished shaft.” (Isaiah 49:2)

Singapore’s Sensational Orchid Garden

Meijer GardenWhen Susan and I took Cindi to Meijer Gardens on her birthday last month, Pink OrchidsjpgCindi mentioned how much she loved orchids, Balboa Park Botanic Building so I told her about having recently visited San Diego’s Balboa Park, Balboa Park Orchids where they have this incredibly beautiful botanic building that’s overflowing Orchids in Balboa Park's Botanic Buildingwith 100s (perhaps 1000s?) of orchids… more orchids than I’d ever seen in my Lush orchids. Balboa Park Botanic Buildingentire life, and Cindi decided on the spot to put that building on her bucket list! National Orchid Garden 15Well, Cindi (and orchid lovers the world around), do I ever have news for you!  Orange orchidsOrchids are the national flower of Singapore, National Orchid Garden & they have a free National Orchid Garden that’s home to 60,000 orchid plants,Yellow orchid-lined path. National Orchid Garden including 1,000 different species National Orchid Garden 6 and more than 2,000 hybrids. National Orchid Garden 14 Orchids are tropical plants, and I’ve been really excited that I’ve been able Orchids to grow a few orchids in our sunny garden room here in Michigan. National Orchid Garden 16 However, Singapore is just 1° north of the equator at the south end of the Malay National Orchid Garden 10Peninsula and is the perfect tropical environment for keeping orchids happy! Garden Room They need no shelter, such as orchids need in Michigan to keep them warm, National Orchid Garden 11 nor do they need protection from the heat and drought,  as they do in San Diego. National Orchid Garden 13In Singapore, orchids grow by the thousands outside in the fresh air and sunshine… National Orchid Garden 8 rather like rose gardens flourish (with care, of course) in temperate regions. National Orchid Garden 7 Singapore’s National Botanic Garden consists of three artistically designed and National Orchid Garden 12meticulously maintained hectares of gardens built on the highest hill and slopes National Orchid Garden 1of Singapore Botanic Gardens (which happen to be the only free garden in the world that’s open 5am-midnight every single day of the year). National Orchid Garden 3 So…if you’re in the area, you can go before any other attraction opens or visit long after other sites have closed! National Orchid Garden 2 I imagined feeling like Eve wandering through the Garden of Eden. National Orchid Garden 9 What would it take to produce a life that glorious?

National Orchid Garden 4For our conversation is in heaven; from whence also we look for the Saviour, the Lord Jesus Christ: Who shall change our vile body, that it may be fashioned like unto his glorious body, according to the working whereby he is able even to subdue all things unto himself” (Philippians 3:20-21).

 

Rise Up, My Love (129): Growing a Garden

Crocuses and Siberian Squill4:15     “A fountain of gardens…” Think more with me about how a garden enclosed becomes a fountain of gardens. Do you enjoy gardening? It is a favorite pastime of mine…not because I enjoy the work, but because I love the results! I particularly love perennials, because they come back year after year and multiply. It is springtime out my window now, and there is indeed a “host, a crowd of golden daffodils” edging the driveway and woods…dancing with the hyacinths in the garden and beckoning me down our woodland path. But, this is only a beginning. I know that a parade of tulips and lilacs will follow in May…then peonies…glorious roses and irises in June…a rainbow of lilies in July…roses of Sharon in August, and chrysanthemums in September…supported by daises, delphiniums, holly hocks…on and on! Lilies by the PoolOur yard was not always so lushly adorned. When we first moved in, there was not a garden to be found and hardly a flower blooming! The builders had the modern “low maintenance, shrub only” philosophy. The transformation started with a few bulbs here, and a few sale finds there. My husband put in a big vegetable garden in the field that had once been an asparagus farm. When our toddlers started falling into the swimming pool, my husband and our older sons put up a pretty wooden fence, which I edged with grape vines and blackberry bushes interspersed with flowers. The edge of the lake became a wildflower garden with marsh marigolds, flags, and forget-me-nots transplanted from our previous home. In front of the shrubbery around the house, we planted perennials. Every winter, I paged through seed catalogues and dreamed of what garden to make the next spring. Creeping phlox one spring…blackberries one fall. fairy-land-forest-floorI remember digging wild roses out of the woods and transplanting them along the fence line of our road where they could stretch and breathe in the open sunshine. (And I remember the severe case of poison ivy I developed from those first forays into the woods!) I remember the year there was a wonderful sale on hybrid tea roses, and I spent a day sloshing in the mud and singin’ in the rain while I made a rose garden. I remember all the roses that died out along our garden fence when a neighbor ran a weed whacker along his side of the fence, and the field of daffodils my husband accidentally mowed down. I remember the hosta lilies and bleeding hearts I transplanted into our woods, and the violets and lily-of-the-valleys that made the journey from our trout pond in Marquette to brighten our new swamp..and the delight I found in discovering that our new woods had snowy trillium, spotty yellow trout lilies, and hepatica, just like our woods up north!

I remember the triumphs and defeats, the joys and woes, the successes and failures, and all the lessons learned along the way as we turned our new property into a veritable “fountain of gardens.” There were years of hard work and expense— “blood, sweat, and tears”—that went into (and are still going into) the development of our little piece of property. As I work to transform this bit of earthly sod into our personal Garden of Eden, I am poignantly reminded of how God patiently works in my life to transform it into the beautiful masterpiece he wants me to become.

One of the encouraging things about our gardens is to see the gradual improvement over the years. No, our property isn’t perfect, and no, it isn’t complete. Far, far from it! In fact, the harder we try, the more we see the endless possibilities and overwhelming amount of work that could be done! And yet, it is so much lovelier than it was when we first bought it! When we first bought our home, the woods was nothing but a tangle of wild grapes and poison ivy vines threatening to undo us if we dared to enter the wooded swamp. There were mosquitoes galore, and no way to ford the mucky stream across the bayou into the swamp. Five years later, a lovely wood-chipped trail meanders through the woods, and a little bridge crosses the stream. Some of the beauties that lay hidden there all the time…like the delicate woodland roses…have been dug up and transplanted to a sunny spot here and there where all can enjoy their beauty. How like our Master, who redeems us, makes inroads into our hearts, and finds the gifts that were latent within us, bringing them out into the open for all to enjoy. (And just like our neighbor inadvertently cut down dozens of wild roses, so people will trample many of the spiritual gifts we offer them!) Our front yard in summerCan you see the beautiful parallels? Everything the Lord gives us in this life is to teach us some spiritual truth! Do you have a garden? Let the unending battle with weeds teach you of the unending battle against sin in our hearts. Let the gradual progress encourage you in your own growth. No, our gardens will never be “perfect and complete” in this life—nor will our hearts—but someday…someday we shall be like him in all his glory, for we shall see him as he is! “But until then, my heart will go on singing, until then, with joy I’ll carry on. Until the day, my eyes behold His glory, until the day he calls me home” (Stuart Hamblen).