Category Archives: Health Issues

Potato Peel Pie You Can Actually Serve for Company Dinner or Breakfast!

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society has been so popular that people have been trying to figure out how to make potato peel pies. In reality, of course, they were fit only for the palates of those who were on the edge of starvation, but it did pique my interest. What were they made from, and could I make a version that would actually taste good? I looked online and learned that they were made from potatoes, a bit of beet, and a bit of milk, but the only actual recipe I could find called for frozen, shredded potatoes and no potato peels. That didn’t satisfy. Allrecipes.com sponsors recipes for sweet potato pies, but not potato peel pies. Therefore, I took up the challenge, and as it passed muster for my personal Bake Off judges (my husband and son), I’ll pass it along to you:

Perfectly Delicious Potato Peel Pie
(the way they might have made it if they’d had the ingredients)
(Serves 6)

Ingredients:
3 large potatoes
3 beets: tops chopped and boiled for 2 minutes in lightly salted water
1/2 pound bacon fried with one chopped onion
4 eggs whisked with:
2 teaspoons fresh garlic
1/2 teaspoon seasoning salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons butter
1/3 cup milk

How to make:
#1.Preheat oven to 350°F.
#2. Peel potatoes and place peelings in an 9″ pie plate. Arrange.
#3. Slice potatoes into thin chunks and boil in salted water for 1/2 hour (until fork-tender).
#4. Boil the beets (washed but unpeeled) in slightly salted water for 45 minutes.
#5. Fry 1/2 pound of bacon with one medium chopped onion. Don’t drain off fat.
#6. Cook chopped beet greens for just 2 minutes in boiling water. #7.  Drain and rinse in a collander to remove juice and stop cooking process.
#8. Whisk together:
4 eggs
2 teaspoons fresh garlic
1/2 teaspoon seasoning salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
#9. Add cooked greens to egg mixture.
#10. Pour egg mixture and greens into pie pan.
#11. Spoon fried bacon and onions over top, complete with drippings.
#12. Bake uncovered in an oven at 350°F. for 1/2 hour. Remove from oven. If there’s any extra fat or juice, pour it into a small container to save for the beets.
#13. While the pie is baking, and after the potatoes are cooked, mash the potatoes with:
2 tablespoons butter
1/3 cup milk
Whip in a mixing bowl until really fluffy (can add a little more milk if needed)
#14. After the pie has baked for 1/2 hour, remove and cover with mashed potatoes. Return to oven, kick up the heat to “broil” at 450° and bake until the top starts to brown, around 10-15 minutes, but lower your rack so it’s not the closest to the broiler, to keep it from burning (one slot down works best). Keep an eye on your pie, because it will go from not looking brown at all to being very brown in a matter of a few minutes.
#15. If you don’t like beets, then you’re done with your pie, but you need the greens and stems, so you may as well serve the beets while you’re at it! (Low high, high nutritive value!) To finish off the beets, pour out the hot water and rinse them in cold water for about 3-5 minutes until they’re cool enough to handle. By gently rubbing the skins, they will slide right off.
#15. Cut off the ends or any dark patches, and return them to the pan (to keep warm).
#16. Pour the leftover juice from the pie onto the beets to season them. If there wasn’t any grease bubbling around the edges, then you can also just add butter and salt to taste. (Some people like onion and garlic powder and pepper too.)
#17. Serve it up good and hot for dinner!  It’s almost a dinner in one, because it has your protein, veggies, and starch, but a few sides make it all the better!      Last night I served the pie and beets with a fresh fruit salad and mulled cider. The three of us ate half of it for dinner . . . and the other half this morning for breakfast with hot chocolate, English muffins, and the rest of the fruit salad.  Of course, during World War 2, I don’t suppose people had bacon, and the pie could be made without (or with a cup of cubed chicken, ham, pork sausage, or whatever you have on hand and like), but meat definitely adds to the flavor! If you try it, let me know if you like it, will you?

They shall be abundantly satisfied with the fatness of thy house;
and thou shalt make them drink of the river of thy pleasures
” (Psalm 36:8).

Ham and Cheesy Scalloped Potatoes: To Peel, or Not To Peel

I grew up peeling potatoes for mashed or scalloped potatoes, but when I asked my  mother why, she said it was simply considered “fashionable.” Poor people didn’t peel potatoes, because they needed the nourishment, but richer people didn’t have to use the potato skins. During World War 2, many people were starving and felt lucky even having potato peels to eat. As an adult, I’ve since learned that potato peels have no fat, cholesterol or sodium and are high in fiber, potassium, calcium, vitamins C and B, and are also rich in photonutrients (which may fight cancer and heart disease). In short, I started to peel the potatoes for this blog since “that’s the way you’re supposed to do it,” but then it occurred to me that I was being fraudulent, because I don’t peel my potatoes for the health benefits (as well as wanting to be a wise steward of my money). So, in the first photo, the potatoes are peeled, but in the next photo, the potatoes are not peeled . . . for the sake of health and thrift! So, take your pick, but never peel your potatoes unless you really, really want to!

If you (like me) tend to serve ham at some time during the holidays, you may end up with quite a bit of leftover ham. Our family’s favorite way to use the leftovers is to make a ham and cheese casserole. It’s easy, and only gets better the next day! The only trick is that it takes about an hour and a half to bake, so you have to prepare it by mid-afternoon if you want to serve it for dinner.

Ham and Cheesy Scalloped Potatoes
(Serves 4+ [up to 6, depending on appetites])

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Layer in a 8X12″ casserole dish:
2 medium potatoes peeled (or not). Layer them in the bottom.Add 1 small (to medium) onion, also chopped into small chunks, and 16 oz. (2 cups) sliced, cooked ham, chopped into bite-sized pieces. Add 2 more medium potatoes sliced or diced and
1 cup gelatin from ham (optional, but it does add moisture, protein, and flavor).

Blend together:
1 cup milk
1 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon seasoning salt (Lawry’s or your favorite)
2 teaspoons crushed garlic (fresh or dried)
1/2 cup grated cheese
(your favorite; I used an Italian 6-cheese blend, but mozzarella is always popular, or some type of cheddar).
Pour mixture over ham and potatoes.
Cover with 6 oz. (1.5 cups) grated cheese (the rest of a 2-cup package).Bake it uncovered for an hour and a half in a hot oven at 350°F. I usually cover it with aluminum foil and then turn the oven down to 200°F. and let it continue baking until it’s time to put it on the table (but for no more than another half an hour). Serve it up with a few side dishes (I used leftover corn, homemade cranberry sauce, and a spinach salad with pecans . . . all super simple) and enjoy!  🙂

For everything created by God is good, and nothing is to be rejected if it is received with thanksgiving; for then it is consecrated by the word of God and prayer” (1 Timothy 4:4-5). I suspect there may be health benefits in abstaining from certain types of meat—or all meats for that matter—but if you eat ham, I think you’ll enjoy this dish!

 

 

Meditating on the Commands of Christ (12): Hold Thy Peace and Come Out of Him

Do you know anyone who feels like they cannot control their actions? I have known several people who, when deeply entrapped by some addiction, felt like they lost the power to choose and seemed to have no ability to stop their self-destructive habit, whether it was alcohol, drugs, porn, sex, or whatever. I’m not spiritually perceptive enough to know whether or not these people have been overtaken by “unclean spirits,” but there are clearly accounts of this happening during the time of Christ, and so it seems likely that evil spirits can possess people today. As 2018 draws to a close, I find great comfort in this next command of Christ, which wasn’t directed to a person per se, but to an evil spirit who was living within a man and causing great agony. The account is found both in Mark 1:21-28 and in Luke 4:31-37 (written out at the end if you’d like to read them). After the marriage feast in Cana, Jesus and his disciples came to Capernaum, where Jesus began teaching in the synagogue on the sabbath days. Reading the Torah (Old Testament Law) was a common practice, but the people were astonished by Jesus, because the usual format was to ponder the meaning of the various readings, but instead Jesus was explaining authoritatively what they meant. During one of these teaching times, a man who was possessed with an unclean spirit became disruptive and started yelling for Jesus to leave “them” alone. I don’t know if the man was speaking his own thoughts, or if the “unclean devil” was actually speaking through the man. If it was the man speaking, then it sounds like he was trying to protect the evil within him . . . so like the addict who will lie, cheat, steal, and worse if necessary to protect the evil that is ruining his life. If it was the devil speaking, then the man had indeed allowed the evil spirit to take control of his body, and the man probably had lost the power to control himself.The next declarations coming from the lips of the possessed man change from plural to singular, and I believe this shows a transition from the man and unclean spirit speaking together to the devil speaking through the man: “What have we to do with thee, thou Jesus of Nazareth? art thou come to destroy us? I know thee who thou art, the Holy One of God.” I believe that last statement—”I know thee who thou art, the Holy One of God— came straight from the unclean spirit, because, at this early point in Jesus’s ministry, practically no human on earth understood that Jesus was “the Holy One of God.” Certainly the man with the unclean spirit would not have known this. However, Satan and his minions did understand this, as we learn from James 2:19: “Thou believest that there is one God; thou doest well: the devils also believe, and tremble.Evil spirits know who God is, and who Jesus is, and they fear, but rather than repenting, they are bent on destroying the works of God. Jesus—on the other hand—had no fear and had complete authority over the evil spirits. (Matthew 28:18, “And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth.”)Therefore, Jesus was able to command the unclean spirit: “Hold thy peace, and come out of him” (Luke 4:35). “Hold thy peace” sounds rather polite in the King James, although alternate translations from the Greek into modern English include “Be silent” or “Be muzzled.” The devil had no option but to obey: “And when the devil had thrown him in the midst, he came out of him, and hurt him not” (Luke 4:35).  As 2018 ends and 2019 is about to begin, here is a wonderful insight for us: Jesus can free people from addictions. Are you or someone you love caught in a trap of evil so strong that it appears there’s no hope for recovery? As long as someone is alive, there is hope! Even if someone has lost the power to control himself, God can still intervene and heal that person. Could that person be you? Could it be someone you love dearly? Ask Jesus to intervene and rescue. If it’s within your power to go (or get your loved one to go) to a facility where you can get help, please do so! However, if that is beyond your power, you can always pray fervently. Ask day and night, in faith, until Jesus steps in and changes everything. I am praying for this in the lives of two precious friends. As long as there is life, there’s hope. Let’s never give up! If you’d like me to pray with you about your own needs or those of someone dear to you, please contact me at: kathrynwarmstrong@gmail.com

And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint . . . And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them?” (Luke 18:1,7. Luke 18:1-7 tells the entire parable.)

  “And they went into Capernaum; and straightway on the sabbath day he entered into the synagogue, and taught. 22 And they were astonished at his doctrine: for he taught them as one that had authority, and not as the scribes. 23 And there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit; and he cried out, 24 Saying, Let us alone; what have we to do with thee, thou Jesus of Nazareth? art thou come to destroy us? I know thee who thou art, the Holy One of God. 25 And Jesus rebuked him, saying, Hold thy peace, and come out of him. 26 And when the unclean spirit had torn him, and cried with a loud voice, he came out of him. 27 And they were all amazed, insomuch that they questioned among themselves, saying, What thing is this? what new doctrine is this? for with authority commandeth he even the unclean spirits, and they do obey him. 28 And immediately his fame spread abroad throughout all the region round about Galilee.” (Mark 1:21-28).

“[Jesus] came down to Capernaum, a city of Galilee, and taught them on the sabbath days. 32 And they were astonished at his doctrine: for his word was with power. 33 And in the synagogue there was a man, which had a spirit of an unclean devil, and cried out with a loud voice, 34 Saying, Let us alone; what have we to do with thee, thou Jesus of Nazareth? art thou come to destroy us? I know thee who thou art; the Holy One of God. 35 And Jesus rebuked him, saying, Hold thy peace, and come out of him. And when the devil had thrown him in the midst, he came out of him, and hurt him not. 36 And they were all amazed, and spake among themselves, saying, What a word is this! for with authority and power he commandeth the unclean spirits, and they come out. 37 And the fame of him went out into every place of the country round about.” (Luke 4:31-37)

(The photographs [versus paintings and woodcuts] are courtesy of BBM’s Lumo Project.)

Pumpkin Bars with Cream Cheese Frosting

I know it would be ideal to be sharing heart-healthy, low calorie recipes with you for holiday celebrations, but we have some yummy family favorites that are at least an improvement over the standard options without being really non-fat or low cal. Last week’s date bar recipe—with dates and oats—is a big step up from candy, and today’s recipe, pumpkin bars—with pureed pumpkin—is healthier than traditional cakes or brownies. Besides, they taste great and are always a hit at potlucks and parties!

Pumpkin Bars
(makes 24 medium  or 48 small bars)

1. Preheat oven to 350°F.

2. In a large mixing bowl, combine:
1 15-oz can pumpkin
4 eggs
1 and 2/3 cups granulated white sugar
2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 cup canola (or other cooking) oil
1/2 cup softened butter
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

3. Beat until smooth and then pour batter into a well greased, large cookie sheet and bake for 25 minutes or until done. My pan is 17″ by 11″ and the pumpkin batter fits perfectly. A large jelly roll pan also works. If you use a smaller cookie sheet, it won’t all fit without overflowing and burning as it bakes. It can also be baked in a 9″ by 13″ pan, but this makes the bars very thick, and they’d have to be baked longer. (Not to mention, you’d also have super thick frosting with less surface area.) Test it for done-ness just like any cake: It’s done when the top is golden brown, the edges start to pull away from the sides of the pan, and the top springs back when touched gently (or a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out not wet).

4. When cooled (but it can be still warm) frost with:

Cream Cheese Frosting

Combine in mixer:
5 cups confectioner’s (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup softened butter
8 oz. softened creamed cheese
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 tablespoons milk or cream

Whip in mixer until fluffy, and then spread. The frosting will be quite soft, so use just 1 tablespoon milk if you want it to be thick. (I like it soft because it spreads easier). After frosting, sprinkle a little more cinnamon on the top.

Serve whenever. Warm with ice cream is amazing, but it doesn’t really need ice cream to be great because it’s so moist on its own. If you have a lot left over, refrigerate after the first day or so to retain freshness and consistency.

Psalm 95

O come, let us sing unto the Lord: let us make a joyful noise to the rock of our salvation.Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving, and make a joyful noise unto him with psalms.For the Lord is a great God, and a great King above all gods.In his hand are the deep places of the earth: the strength of the hills is his also.The sea is his, and he made it: and his hands formed the dry land.O come, let us worship and bow down: let us kneel before the Lord our maker.For he is our God; and we are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand. To day if ye will hear his voice,Harden not your heart, as in the provocation, and as in the day of temptation in the wilderness:When your fathers tempted me, proved me, and saw my work.10 Forty years long was I grieved with this generation, and said, It is a people that do err in their heart, and they have not known my ways:11 Unto whom I sware in my wrath that they should not enter into my rest.” May we come before God’s presence with thanksgiving this holiday season and find our rest in Him!

 

The Ultimately Creamy Tiramisu: With or Without

Tiramisu has long been a favorite dessert in our family, especially when we eat Italian food, so my son Joel has been practicing this year and has it down to an art. He even tried making his own ladyfingers (although he says it’s a lot easier to just buy a couple of packages), and he’s perfected the balance of cream with the other flavors to make a memorable dessert that can last several days in the refrigerator and just seems to improve over time! Previously, tiramisu was a dessert I never really attempted to make, I think because I don’t like the heavy alcohol flavoring common in most batches. However, I was surprised but very pleased to discover that the tiramisu I bought for my son Michael’s family in Italy this summer had no alcohol whatsoever, so it emboldened me to work  out an authentic, non-alcoholic recipe that tastes great. You may wonder why I have such a vendetta against alcohol (some of my own kids do), but it’s because I have so many friends who have been hurt by the impact of immoderate alcohol consumption. Just this week, a report came out from the WHO (World Health Organization) stating that 1 in 20 deaths world-wide is due to alcoholism. That’s a shockingly high statistic to me when you consider war, accidents, and disease. Sure, alcohol is probably related to the majority of mechanical accidents, but alcohol is one of the few things in life that we absolutely do not need in order to carry on life (unless someone becomes addicted…which is what unfortunately happens all too often). Therefore, why take a chance with a non-essential substance that gives you a 1 in 20 chance of either killing yourself or someone you love? (And, if you’re in your 20’s, the chance goes to 1 in 7.)Well, I’ll get off my soapbox in a minute and share the recipe, but I also wanted to point out an article from The Washington Post entitled, “Americans Are Drinking Themselves to Death at Record Rates,” which states that 30% of Americans don’t drink at all.* So…if you don’t drink, please don’t feel like you’re the only one out there (which has happened to me a few times). There are a lot of fellow water or Pepsi totters, so the resistance movement is strong!

Ultimately Creamy Tiramisu

Custard:

In a quart-sized sauce pan, whip together:
6 egg yolks
1/2 cup granulated sugar. When well blended, add
2/3 cup milk
Cook over medium heat, whisking constantly until it bubbles and thickens. Cool and refrigerate until well chilled. Then carefully whisk in:
1 pound mascarpone cheese until it’s all smooth and uniformly mixed. Refrigerate this mixture until you’re ready to assemble everything.

Whipping Cream:

Whip together until stiff peaks form:
1.25 cups heavy whipping cream
1/2 teaspoon vanilla. Refrigerate until ready to assemble.

Coffee mixture to soak the lady fingers:

5 tablespoons espresso coffee mixed with 6 tablespoons of “something.” Many recipes call for rum or amaretto, but you can also use:
5 tablespoons of white grape juice plus
2 teaspoons of almond extract

To assemble everything:

Lay out one 3-ounce package of ladyfinger (spongecake) cookies flat in the bottom of a 13X9″ pan. If they aren’t already split in half, split them. Drizzle half of the coffee mixture over the cookies, then add half the custard gently, spreading it carefully until all the cookies are covered. Next add half the whipped cream, spreading it over the top. Then, carefully arrange a second 3-ounce package of split ladyfinger spongecake cookies on top of the mixture. Drizzle them with the rest of the coffee mixture. Add the rest of the custard, and top with the rest of the whipped cream, making sure everything is level and covered at each step. Sprinkle liberally with sifted cocoa powder. Ideally, chill it for 4-6 hours at least before serving to let the flavors meld. (As a side note: soft ladyfingers are best, but if you can only find the hard kind, dip them individually into the coffee mixture to make sure they’re soaked before arranging them one by one in the pan. Also, use 6 tablespoons each of coffee and white grape juice instead of 5.) Tiramisu is best if it’s allowed to sit in the refrigerator for a few hours before serving, and it continues to taste great for several days (although it never lasts very long at our house)!                                               Enjoy!! We sure do!  🙂

“Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging: and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise” (Proverbs 20:1)

*https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/12/22/americans-are-drinking-themselves-to-death-at-record-rates/?utm_term=.b105c5ec4cfd

 

Fresh’n’Sweet Tomato Soup

When you were little, did you have a favorite soup? How about now? When I was little, my favorite lunch was tomato soup with grilled cheese sandwiches, and this is still the favorite lunch of my youngest son’s lifelong buddy (who’s now an adult). Also, on our recent cruise of the North Sea, we were served tomato soup several times and discovered that it’s popular not only aboard ships but on land as well…from Iceland to India. Therefore, I believe it’s an international, inter-generational classic!Alan and I have enjoyed many iterations of tomato soup, such as this unusual bowl of tomato soup with spinach and pasta. Tomato basil soup has become quite popular with hipsters and in upscale restaurants. My “Little Sister, Liz” made some from scratch last time I visited her in Washington D.C. , and it was outstanding!However, I think possibly the best tomato soup I’ve ever tasted was served at Friðheimar, a restaurant near Selfoss, Iceland, while Alan and I were on the  “Golden Circle Tour.” It was basically super fresh and creamy, with a swirl of yogurt and a sprinkling of parsley on top. Of course, I don’t know exactly what ingredients go into fabulous dishes, but I can usually come pretty close, so I want to share what I dreamed up, inspired by mulling over the delectable tastes and smells of that wonderful meal and dedicated to the memory of Iceland. If you’re the chef at Friðheimar and find this recipe, please feel free to share “the real” recipe with us. I looked online trying to find your recipe, but all I found were reviews that said things like, “the best fresh tomato soup I’ve ever tasted,” “we just instantly fell in love with the sweet’n’fresh tomato soup,” “simple but so tasty,” “amazing soup,” “gorgeous soup,” etc. That’s just the way we felt too! So, I tried, but mine is not as amazing as my memory of Friðheimar’s. Maybe I’ll write and ask him if he’ll share his recipe. Meanwhile, here’s a bright, healthy soup to warm you up on a chilly autumn day.

Fresh’n’Sweet Tomato Soup

In a large stock pot, combine:
2 tablespoons butter (turn on heat and melt), then add
1 medium onion, finely chopped (I only used half of the one above)
1 garlic clove (or 1 teaspoon pressed garlic; I just used 1 clove of this bulb)
1/2  teaspoon salt
1  teaspoon (your favorite; mine is Lawry’s) seasoning salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper. Saute until the onions start to brown. Then add:
2 tablespoons flour; stir until absorbed into the juices before adding:4 large tomatoes, cubed
1 tablespoon granulated white sugar
1 teaspoon crushed basil
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
2 cups chicken broth (or 2 cups of water and 2 chicken bouillon cubes=2 tablespoons of chicken bouillon powder) Simmer for 30 minutes on medium heat.  Let it rest 15 minutes, then run it through a food mill or use a blender or immersion blender to puree. At this point, I believe Friðheimar must have run the puree through a strainer to remove skins and seeds, but I tend to think all sources of healthy fiber are good for  you, so I didn’t. Suit yourself on this one.Next, taste it, and possibly add more salt and pepper per your personal taste.
Just before serving, reheat to make it piping hot, and serve with some swirls of yogurt and sprinkles of parsley (fresh or crushed).

Better is a dinner of herbs where love is,
than a stalled ox and hatred therewith
” (Proverbs 15:17).

P.S.—In the picture above, I had stirred extra yogurt into the soup (trying to match the color I remembered and add protein), but it wasn’t as yummy with the yogurt as without, so I left it out of the recipe above. Tomato soup is very light, however, so it’s good to combine it with something like fruit and fresh bread with cheese or a grilled cheese sandwich so you don’t end up hungry in an hour! 🙂  )

 

 

Fabulous Salmon Salads Fit for a Caesar

In honor of summer just beginning, this Saturday I want to inspire you with ideas for how to create incredible salmon dishes for hot (or cool) summer days. This first photo was taken at the Boat House in Disney Springs, Florida. It had field greens, butternut squash, Honeycrisp apples, feta cheese, chopped bacon, toasted pumpkin seeds and a maple vinaigrette dressing…and was possibly the best salmon salad I’ve ever eaten! Epcot’s Rose & Crown Restaurant also serves an excellent salmon dish, although perhaps geared more for a cool evening. Their pan-roasted Scottish salmon dinner was outstanding! It included Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, new potatoes, baked apples, and a lime-saffron infused Aioli sauce. I’ve already written up a recipe for Aioli sauce (https://kathrynwarmstrong.wordpress.com/2017/03/18/lenten-special-ahi-tuna-with-super-simple-aioli-sauce/) but I want to point out that you can add many different touches to make it even more memorable. I’ve also since learned that the English have a trick:  Adding a little garlic to mayonnaise makes a simple dressing that can actually compete in my affection with ketchup for dipping french fries. (But, never call them “french fries” in England! They’re “chips!”) Another fantastic salmon salad I had was in Hawaii. This one was honey-glazed, grilled, and put to rest on a bed of spinach with red onions, bacon bits, slivered almonds, and mandarin oranges with a tangy orange-basil vinaigrette. Obviously, nobody wants to give away their signature recipes, but I’ve learned from experimenting that you can use equal parts of your favorite vinegar and oil (or even your favorite Italian), add whatever you like to give it an extra spark (be it maple syrup, basil and bits of grated orange peel, or anything else that suits your fancy and seems like it might complement your dish), plus some salt and pepper…maybe a little onion or garlic powder…and voilà! You’ve created your own unique take on salad dressing!Here is one of my own creations, just a garden salad with peppers, cucumbers, celery, tomatoes, black olives, and Parmesan cheese.  Really, salmon (or any meaty fish) is very versatile. When our kids were little, we couldn’t afford to eat fish very often, but Alan says that having fish once a week is a healthy practice, so I’ve been trying to serve it more.This time I loaded it heavily with fresh garlic and Italian dressing before grilling it, then served a mango/onion/avocado salsa and asparagus as sides. I’ve also tried grilling the asparagus (basted with a little oil and salt) along with the salmon, then added potato salad and cold slaw. This special occasion included “salmon mignon.” (Mignon may be defined as “small and delicate” but I really think it means “round, fat, and especially juicy!”) If you’re looking for a perfect summer lunch party idea, this salmon served on a bun with veggies and a side salad might meet your needs. After walking around Mackinac Island a few weeks ago, this flavorful meal from the Village Bell totally refilled my tank! (Ranch dressing added to the sandwich was a good touch.) Even a chunk of grilled salmon atop a simple Caesar salad made of Romaine leaves, croutons, and grated Parmesan cheese tossed with creamy Caesar dressing can totally satisfy most people on a warm day. Hot or cold, summer or winter, salmon is always considered a royal treat… fit for a Caesar, or for your favorite people. Happy Summering! Hopefully, I’ve given you a few ideas that will add fuel to the fire of your creative culinary imagination!And I say unto you, Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you. For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened. If a son shall ask bread of any of you that is a father, will he give him a stone? or if he ask a fish, will he for a fish give him a serpent? Or if he shall ask an egg, will he offer him a scorpion? If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children: how much more shall your heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to them that ask him?” (Luke 11:9-13).