Tag Archives: What’s the best wine in the world?

Rise Up, My Love (242): The Best Wine

Song of Solomon 7:9 “And the roof of thy mouth like the best wine for my beloved, that goeth down sweetly, causing the lips of those that are asleep to speak.” Some verses appear difficult at a distance but easily yield their meaning when studied. Other verses appear simple with a cursory reading but actually become very difficult to understand when scrutinized carefully. This verse has been extremely difficult to “cut open.” At first reading, my tendency was to paraphrase it something like this: “I love french-kissing you! It’s better than the best wine, which flows down so smoothly that it even wakes up those who are sleeping.”

But, is that what the verse is really saying, and even if it is…what spiritual truth is the Lord conveying? One thing that complicates trying to understand the verse’s meaning is the little phrase “my beloved.” Does “my beloved” refer to the husband, or his wife? The husband has obviously been talking. “And the roof of thy mouth” is a continuation of the husband’s description of his wife; i.e.: the roof of her mouth. The suffix on the Hebrew noun translated “your mouth” is feminine, so it is definitely the wife being described up to that point.

But if the husband actually says that the roof of her mouth is like the best wine “for my beloved,” a proper continuation of the thought would demand that “my beloved” is the wife, so the husband is not saying that the wine slides smoothly down his throat, but hers. In other words, he would not be saying that he responds to french-kissing his wife as if he were drinking the best wine, but rather that her taste is like wine for herself. What’s the problem with that?

Well, first, most people assume that the intended imagery is that the wife’s sweet kisses are as pleasurable to the husband as drinking the best wine. But, if the wine is going down her throat, not his, then he is describing her pleasure, not his, which has not happened heretofore in the book. The second problem is simply one of usage. The term “beloved” is used 103 times in Scripture, and twenty-six of those usages (fully one-fourth of all instances) are in the Song of Solomon. In every other instance, “beloved” clearly refers to the husband. The term “my beloved” is similar. It is used forty-two times in Scripture, and over half (twenty-two) of the instances are in Song of Solomon…always speaking of the husband unless 7:9 is an exception.

“My beloved” is used elsewhere nine times to refer to Christ, nine times by Paul and James to refer to Christian brethren or sons in the faith, once in reference to God, and once—only once in all those occasions…but still, once—of Israel, in the feminine form, as the adulterous wife of God (Jeremiah 11:15). Commentators don’t just split the ballot over this issue, they splinter it! Because the most ancient Hebrew had no punctuation marks (those written in present day texts were added centuries later), it isn’t possible to reason that verses eight and nine all had to be spoken by the same person “because it’s all one sentence.” This is true in the King James Version’s English translation,  but the original text doesn’t have any demarcations.

No one doubts but that the wife picks up the conversation in verse 10. Although some commentators ascribe verses eight and nine to the husband in their entirety, many modern translations, including the New King James and the NIV, now punctuate the text with “And the roof of thy mouth like the best wine,” as the husband’s concluding comment, and have the wife begin her speech with, “For my beloved, that goeth down sweetly, causing the lips of those that are asleep to speak.”

After prayerfully wrestling with the text for three weeks, I now believe that verse nine should indeed be split. Hikek is the Hebrew word here translated “roof of thy mouth.” Some translations render it as “kisses,” but this is somewhat interpretive, since the word is common and used elsewhere with the more straightforward meaning of palate (as in this verse), mouth (5:16), or taste (2:3) . “…like the best wine…” The value and symbolic significance of wine in the Bible have already been discussed at length. Wine is symbolic of joy and abundant living. In chapter one, verse four, the bride declares, “We will remember thy love more than wine.” Here the husband returns the compliment and makes it superlative by saying that his wife’s kisses are “like the best wine.” Loving her produces a joy in him that is the very best of the best! “…for my beloved.”

Given that in every other instance in the entire book “my beloved” is a name used as a term of endearment by the wife for her husband, the evidence overwhelmingly supports the idea that at this juncture the husband’s praises end, and the wife begins her response. In that light, it is easy to understand the husband’s final comment as a beautiful capstone on his delicate adulation of this most wondrously intimate experience of marriage. The couple had just enjoyed sexual union, and lying in each other’s arms during the quiet glow that followed— breathing in her very breath and drinking in her kisses—he summed up his delight in her as if he’d just partaken of the world’s most highly prized and delectable beverage.

Use a more general definition of hikek and you have: “Your taste is like the best wine!” Oh, beloved of God, meditate on the marvel that Christ has no greater joy than our yielded union with him. It is to us that he declares, “Your taste is like the best wine!”