What’s the Scuttlebutt? How about a Scuttled Bucket?

If you’re like me, you’ve heard the term “scuttlebutt” used as a synonym for “gossip,” but I never knew the derivation until we visited Nelson’s Dockyard in Antigua. Before people knew how to purify water, sailors would store fresh water gathered from local streams for their voyage in caskets. A “butt” was a casket used for storing water, and a “scuttled butt” was a casket that had been scuttled (by cutting a hole in it so people could get the water out). During the voyage, the “scuttlebutt” was the current casket, usually sitting on the main deck, where the sailors could come to drink, and—like employees around a water cooler today—people would often catch up on news and swap stories while drinking the water.

There are so many things I’ve never really reasoned through, but at this fascinating museum of naval history, they made a point out of the fact that water from local streams would not be very clean, and after being stored for weeks on end, it became foul. However, that was all they had, so drink it they did. Better than dying of thirst, although there were times when drinking it resulted in their dying of bacterial infections or other disease-related illnesses.

Do you believe in heaven? There were many people in previous centuries who did not believe in a “new world” across an apparently endless sea. However, there were also a few brave sailors who believed—at least enough to attempt crossing the ocean. For those who believed and were willing to travel, and survived the trip, they really did find a new world. On their journey, the sailors had to drink water to keep them going, but if the water was putrid, it may have killed them at any rate.

This is true for us in the spiritual realm as well. Some people don’t even believe in a “new world” called heaven and have no interest in searching for it, but for those of us who do, we’re off on an adventure in a “fellow ship” with other believers. On the way, we need to drink water to survive the trip. The only pure water that remains clean and healthful throughout life is the water of the Word of God. Every other type of spiritual water is just from the “scuttlebutt;” it’s gossip and rumors gathered from local sources that are never pure and always leave a stench in the end . . . perhaps even causing death to those who drink.

In John 4:14, Jesus taught: “Whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; but the water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water springing up into everlasting life.” In Revelation 21:6, Jesus tells John in a vision: “It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.

When we are spiritually thirsty, let’s forget the scuttlebutt and go straight to Jesus and the Bible for our refreshment!

And the Spirit and the bride say, Come. And let him that heareth say, Come. And let him that is athirst come. And whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely” (Revelation 22:17).

 

Finding the Perfect Apartment in the Heart of Paris

paris-springIt was true, although it seemed too good to be true. But, there was one catch. strolling-in-paris-springtimeFirst of all, let me tell you about our apartment. view-along-the-seine-riverIt was just 31 £ per person for the 4 of us,the-river-seine a block from the Seine, notre-dame5 minutes from the Notre Dame, outside-the-louvre-museum-parisand only 15 from the Louvre and d’Orsay. crossaint-and-coffee-parisI feared it might be infested with cockroaches, but it wasn’t, breakfast-at-terressa-flat-parisand we discovered that “Terressa Flat” referred to the fact
that it was a flat with a terrace garden perfect for dining outside! rue-des-lombardsWhat I hadn’t realized was that “Rue des Lombards” is a very famous street,
full of nightlife and jazz clubs.rue-des-lombard-paris-by-night In fact, it was more crowded near midnight than it was in the mornings! paris-springSo, it was an ideal location for experiencing Paris,
but it was absolutely harrowing trying to access our apartment! paris-sightsFor a starter, our sons flew to Paris from Boston and NY,
arriving early the next morning at different times.

street-vendors-along-the-river-seineThe theory was that they would be able to drop off their luggage and pick up a key so they could spend the day exploring before Alan and I arrived about suppertime from Grand Rapids. The realities were that no one was available at the place of residence. No one received them, gave them a key, or offered to hold their luggage. In fact, no one even appeared to speak English or understand rudimentary French.  😦

picnicking-in-the-park-paris-srpingAfter hours of attempts to contact the owner, Stephen was able to communicate (in French…thankfully he’s knows some French) via email, and late in the afternoon he was able to meet “a friend” of the owner who gave him a key and wanted cash (which Stephen didn’t have) for payment. By then, Stephen and Joel had both missed a night’s sleep and were really tired. The man said they could stay, but that he’d return the next day for the rest of the payment.

rue-des-lombards-at-nightAlan and I had had a delayed flight (which is getting to be almost more usual than timely flights) and didn’t arrive until nightfall (long after Stephen and Joel were expecting us) after the taxi driver dropped us off several blocks away, pointing and gesticulating with untranslatable French phrases in the direction of a dark and very busy alley. We slowly mazed our way, dragging our luggage, to what we thought must be the door to our apartment above a very crowded street, but inside the door marked “8” were about 12 possible choices for apartments to ring, none descripted as “Terressa Flat.” One by one we pushed all of the buzzers, to no avail. I think perhaps none of them worked, but I know that the one for our apartment certainly did not, because neither son appeared. We tried calling, but our phones (despite having paid good money for the privilege) didn’t connect.

night-scene-rue-des-lombardWe tried asking help from a couple of sympathetic looking young people, but no one knew anything about that particular apartment and using their cell phones didn’t help make a connection. At long last, Stephen (who’d set his alarm for the occasion) came down to see if we’d arrived yet. Whew! We kissed our sons, kissed the floor, and flopped into bed. What a dreary and inauspicious beginning! However, our holiday in France turned out to be quite the opposite: It was marvelous and memorable!

door-for-our-apt-on-rue-des-lombards-in-parisI’ve thought a lot about how hard it was to get to Terressa Flat, but how much we loved it once we finally arrived. I’m betting heaven will be like that for some. springtime-in-parisIt sounds too good to be true, but it’s not. rue-des-lombards-at-night-2It’s not full of cockroaches (things we don’t like),
but it will be full of music and life. river-seine-on-a-sunny-spring-dayIt will be the perfect location…just down the street from the River of Life
and a place of worship…and close to our favorite attractions.
(For me, that’s going to be loved ones!)walking-along-the-seine-river-paris-springHowever, it may seem almost impossible to figure out how to get there, despite having a reservation. If you’re confused, please pray and ask for help.
(Feel free to ask me in the comment section.) walking-along-the-seine-riverIf you see somebody who looks confused and you understand the language,
reach out and help, will you?

the-river-seine-2And he shewed me a pure river of water of life, clear as crystal, proceeding out of the throne of God and of the Lamb. In the midst of the street of it, and on either side of the river, was there the tree of life, which bare twelve manner of fruits, and yielded her fruit every month: and the leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations. And there shall be no more curse: but the throne of God and of the Lamb shall be in it; and his servants shall serve him…And the Spirit and the bride say, Come. And let him that heareth say, Come. And let him that is athirst come. And whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely.” (Revelation 22:1-3;17)

Water Shortages and Aqueduct Projects

Edge of Sahara Desert. TunisiaIn the middle earth of nowhere’s desolate wasteland, Aqueduct Project 1someone found a spring bubbling up, and around that hot, mineralized water
an aqueduct project was born! Clear water in Aqueduct. Tunisia Water is just as essential to sustaining life as the air we breathe, but for those
of us who grew up taking clean drinking water and hot baths for granted, aqueduct projects may not seem as spectacularly vital as they truly are. Mineral encrusted reedI remember a couple of early experiences that shocked me into understanding water problems from a more global perspective. Nearing Tunisian Saraha DesertAs a teenager, I spent some time working among rural people in the mountainous region around Monterrey, Mexico, where even children were engaged in carrying water over a mile up steep slopes to help sustain their families, and a “bath” consisted of rubbing ash on the baby’s skin.  Aqueduct Project 2At 20 I taught high school in North Carolina and discovered that
a few of my students didn’t even have running water in their rustic homes. Flat barren desert in Tunisia But, it wasn’t until visiting the Sahara Desert last summer—with the sun beating down on me and nothing but sand stretching out for miles in all directions—that I finally understood the intense desperation thirsty people feel…and the lengths to which they’ll go to have their needs met. Aqueduct ProjectOn our trip to Tunisia,
the guide had us stop at one of these amazing aqueduct projects. Aqueduct Project 4 A complex structure was built to protect and transform
the water shooting up from a thermal spring. Aqueduct Project 5The precious water was air-cooled before being collected and channeled into an aqueduct that carried it miles through the desert.  Aqueduct in TunisiaWithout that aqueduct, no one could have settled in this desert region. Cracked Rock:Barren ground Spiritually, humans are no different.
Without the  the Water of Life, no spiritual life can be sustained. Aqueduct Project in TunisiaThere is an aqueduct project here in America to channel the western world’s abundant spiritual resources to parched lands around the globe.Tunisian Aqueduct It’s also called Aqueduct Project, and it’s being developed by my son,
Jonathan (about whom I wrote yesterday), and a team of students and scholars from around the world. Water in AqueductIf you have any interest in finding out more or helping out,
here’s the website: http://aqueductproject.org/ Beautiful Aqueduct. Tunisia“And the Spirit and the bride say, Come. And let him that heareth say, Come. And let him that is athirst come. And whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely” (Revelation 22:17).

(All pictures were taken in Tunisia last summer. In case you have trouble with calcium deposits in your drinking water…note the mineral-encrusted reed!)