Finding Our Way Into the Presence of God

Want to get closer to God but sometimes feel confused by all the voices out there describing their experiences in ways that seem contradictory to your understanding and foreign to anything you’ve experienced? How can you tell what’s real, what’s imaginary, what’s possible, and what’s impossible?

Tim Anderson’s new book, Into His Presence: A Theology of Intimacy with God, comes out of more than thirty-five years of his own life experience in studying, practicing, and teaching the Bible. His book is a truly helpful resource for systematically working through the scriptures in order to understand intimacy with God as communicated in His own words (the Bible)—and as distinguished from some of the contemporary cultural ideas which may (or may not) be consistent with orthodox teaching.

If you’re anything like me, most of the time you want to just “sit and soak” in the soothing presence of God. I love to start each day by meditating on the Bible and praying, memorizing especially helpful passages and worshiping our great God. As a wise friend once said to me, “No day is wasted that’s begun with worshiping God!” Amen.

However, if you have more time to invest and are serious about developing intimacy with God, not simply soaking in the sunshine of our loving Father but in delving deeper into His glorious complexities, then Anderson’s book is definitely worth the wading. It’s very dense. Not a one-night stand! It took me weeks to study and process, and I didn’t agree with everything. (Specifically, I spent over ten years meditating my way through the Song of Solomon and am convinced that it’s a gorgeous [non-sexual, spiritual] allegory of God’s relationship with Israel and the mystery of Christ’s relationship with the Church as well as a human love song.)

That one exception aside, I found myself very much enriched and deepened as I did the hard work of pondering the scriptures focused on the various aspects of people in relationship with God. I especially appreciated Anderson’s chapters discussing intimacy with the Holy Spirit (chapter seven), the role of suffering (chapter 8), and how to assess songs (chapter 9).

Have you ever heard a worship song and said to yourself, “That doesn’t seem right to me!”? Well, it may be wrong! Tim helps the reader develop an ability to analyze music for content, which I think is very needed for our worship leaders! A great song isn’t simply about the music. We all love singable songs, written between C and shining C (at least if you can’t sing like a meadow lark). We all love catchy tunes. We all love lyrics that are fresh and have something new to say. However, if the lyrics aren’t consistent with what we know of God from the scripture, then no number of catchy hooks or riffs can justify a message that’s adrift.

Finally, and this isn’t one of the points in Tim’s book, but as a warning to those of us who’ve spent years in academic circles exercising our brains, the Bible says: “Draw nigh to God, and he will draw nigh to you. Cleanse your hands, ye sinners; and purify your hearts, ye double minded” (James 4:8). Talk about pulling no punches! If we want to experience intimacy with the God of the universe, who is not only love and light and life but the epitome of goodness and holiness, then we’d better be prepared to pray earnestly: “Search me, O God, and know my heart: try me, and know my thoughts: And see if there be any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting” (Psalm 139:23-24). Ultimately, to draw near to the God of Goodness, we must be willing to “abhor that which is evil” and “cleave to that which is good” (Romans 12:9). Otherwise, no amount of study will help us come into the presence of God. “For thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is Holy; I dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit, to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite ones” (Isaiah 57:15). At the end of the day—and beginning of each new day—the bottom line is: Are we trusting and obeying God? If we are, we’ll be growing in intimacy with Him.

But it is good for me to draw near to God: I have put my trust in the Lord God, that I may declare all thy works” (Psalm 73:28).

Trust and Obey
(—John H. Sammis, 1887, Public Domain)

“When we walk with the Lord in the light of His Word,
What a glory He sheds on our way!
While we do His good will, He abides with us still,
And with all who will trust and obey.

Refrain:
“Trust and obey, for there’s no other way
To be happy in Jesus, but to trust and obey.

“Not a shadow can rise, not a cloud in the skies,
But His smile quickly drives it away;
Not a doubt or a fear, not a sigh or a tear,
Can abide while we trust and obey.

“Not a burden we bear, not a sorrow we share,
But our toil He doth richly repay;
Not a grief or a loss, not a frown or a cross,
But is blessed if we trust and obey.

“But we never can prove the delights of His love
Until all on the altar we lay;
For the favor He shows, for the joy He bestows,
Are for them who will trust and obey.

“Then in fellowship sweet we will sit at His feet,
Or we’ll walk by His side in the way;
What He says we will do, where He sends we will go;
Never fear, only trust and obey.”

Window Pains

Deer in lakeThe next best thing to being outside is looking outside, as far as I can tell. Impatiens by lake 6.16We live in the woods on a tiny lake, Racoon by dockand there are few things that give me more “simple pleasure”Delphinium 6.16 than being able to look through the window panes and see something lovely, Old Snageven if it’s just an old snag Sun filtering through trees on lakeor the sun filtering through the trees on his way up   Rabbit eating cloverto greet Bunny Bright Eyes, who’s outside nibbling clover on our front lawn.Geese on lake frontStephen, taking a week’s respite from his PhD studies in NY,
offered to wash our windows, which is even more of a great idea than I realized! IMG_5708It wasn’t until this morning that I really noticed just how dirty our windows are.Reflection in Glass Oh, I always notice that I have to watch my angle
or I’ll get a reflection of myself when shooting out a window, IMG_5731and I notice how the sunshine coming through the window casts reflections thatIMG_5755 are sometimes so compelling that I focus on the reflection more than the reality, IMG_5732or find my vision somewhat obscured. IMG_5754It can be very disorienting! Plants in front of windowThere can also be so many things going on inside that my vision gets blocked. MandevillaMy heart is like that too! Sometimes I’m busily working away, Rain on Mandevillathinking everything is fine and not really noticing that things are getting a bit dingy ( or vaguely conscious but not yet motivated to fix it), Robin feeding babiesand it takes an offer of help from the outside to set things right. Dirty Windows!Of course, there’s nothing like good, strong sunlight to reveal all the dirt! IMG_5706When I sense that my vision’s becoming blurry and my heart is pained,IMG_5719 or that I’m distracted and out of focus, Cross by windowit’s time to listen to the promptings of friends
and let the Holy Spirit wash the windows of my heart, Doe standing at water's edgeso I’ll have clear, bright vision again! Gold Finch singing in the tree topsSearch me, O God, and know my heart: try me, and know my thoughts: And see if there be any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.” (Psalm 139:23-24)

(Just in case you’re wondering, I’m a bit embarrassed to admit it, but I took all these photos out my windows over the past few days and this morning. Isn’t it amazing how clear and clean things can seem if we’re not focusing on them… until the Light shines just right?)