Good Friday: Practicing the Resurrection Principle

Are you anxious about some challenge in your life? Good Friday is the perfect time to remember the Resurrection Principle, which a friend shared with me from Reader’s Digest. By the way, do you ever read Reader’s Digest? My parents subscribed when I was a child, but I didn’t even know it was still in existence until I looked it up today on Wikipedia and read that it’s the largest paid circulation magazine in the world. So, maybe you’ve read all about the Resurrection Principle already, but if not, let me pass along what my friend suggested: “Prayerfully wait three days before becoming anxious about any problem, because most of the time, the problem will be resolved.”

At first I thought, “What? Usually only the most insignificant issues are resolved in three days unless it’s good news about a test or something.” As I considered the challenges in my life that tend to make me anxious, I felt like almost all of them are long-term, on-going difficulties which are out of my control and often take years to resolve. However, it occurred to me that Christ rose again after three days, and that’s the most significant resolution of any problem in the world!

So, like leprous Naaman in 2 Kings 5, I decided to try the Resurrection Principle and see what happened. I found that prayerfully waiting three days rarely brought a clear resolution that chased the clouds away and left me with no further need for faith or dependence on the Lord. However, as I practiced praying earnestly for three days before freaking out, I discovered that most problems were resolved in this way: I learned to lay them down at the feet of Jesus and find peace. It is completely worthwhile to follow 1 Peter 5:7, “Casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you.

Does God love us? Yes. Does God have the power to help us? Yes. Will God answer our prayers in a way that makes us more like Christ and brings glory to Himself? Yes. “He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things?” (Romans 8:32).If you’re struggling with anxiety this Good Friday, why not start practicing the Resurrection Principle? Develop the habit of praying earnestly for three days before you allow yourself to give in to anxious thoughts. Hopefully, this will keep you from jumping on the anxiety roller coaster at all, and perhaps you, like me, will more often be able to find a sense of serenity and rest even in the midst of life’s battles, knowing that God loves us, hears us, and will answer our prayers! Let’s allow the resurrection power and ministry of Christ to flood our souls with light in the darkness, transforming us from anxious souls into spiritual beings.

The Lord is good unto them that wait for him, to the soul that seeketh him” (Lamentations 3:25).

Wait on the Lord: be of good courage, and he shall strengthen thine heart: wait, I say, on the Lord” (Psalm 27:14).

But they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint” (Isaiah 40:31).

(Thanks to Bob Hardee for the two photos with scripture verses imprinted on them!)



War Rooms and Prayer Saunas

Lavish dinnerEvery day was a feast in France, and not just because our hosts were good cooks!Discussion Every day was a spiritual feast too. FriendsOur purpose was to aid in work among North African refugees,Sunrise over French Alps around Grenoble but although we served from dawn ’til setting sun, Sunset in Grenoblewe’d come to the end of each day with a feeling of deep joy and thankfulness
for all the blessings we’d experienced as we tried to bless others. Rainbow over GrenobleTruly, you can’t out give God! Friends gatheringAfter a hard day’s work, we’d often have a marvelous evening meeting friends, Table Hockeyhaving fun together, eating, and hearing stories of redemption…Discussing Great Literaturemost often how God has worked to bring good out of tragic circumstances.Dinner PartyIn France, dinner parties last several hours, and it was often 10 pm by the time we’d head out for our return walk to the youth hostel where we stayed. Last rays of sun in French AlpsIn Grenoble, the sun sets about 9:30 in June, so our walk would be through the deepening shadows of twilight, and I’d be ready to hit the hay for sure! Setting SunNot so my cohort! We ended every night in what affectionately became known as the prayer sauna. We’d meet in the hostel’s library for a sweet hour of prayer.Panorama(This attempt at a panorama shot gives you a little feel:
It was stifling hot and humid in there, and we were tired, thirsty, exhausted
…maybe not even quite all there anymore! 🙂   ) LibraryThe amazing thing to me was that even though I’d be so sleepy I’d feel like I was going to pass out or fall asleep some nights (and yes, sometimes I actually did), Prayer Saunaby the time we were finished, I felt a surge of contentment and joy that perked me up until I really could get washed up and crawl into bed! Paul and ShannonAlso, I am convinced that more of the fruit of our labors resulted
from sweating it out in the prayer sauna at night than from working hard all day.Rainbow in FranceAre you flagging and in need of a blessing? Take it to the Lord in prayer!

 “But they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint” (Isaiah 40:31).

“Sweet hour of prayer! sweet hour of prayer!
That calls me from a world of care,
And bids me at my Father’s throne
Make all my wants and wishes known.
In seasons of distress and grief,
My soul has often found relief,
And oft escaped the tempter’s snare,
By thy return, sweet hour of prayer!

“Sweet hour of prayer! sweet hour of prayer!
Thy wings shall my petition bear
To Him whose truth and faithfulness
Engage the waiting soul to bless.
And since He bids me seek His face,
Believe His Word and trust His grace,
I’ll cast on Him my every care,
And wait for thee, sweet hour of prayer!”
(William W. Walford, 1845)