I’m the Daughter of Adam: Are You Surprised?!

Although compiling a family genealogy (or “family history,” as it’s more popularly called in Europe) has been going on for all of recorded history, tracing your own family tree is a pretty daunting task. In the U.S., most of us were too proletarian to pursue genealogical connections until Alex Haley’s 1976 novel, Roots, took America by storm. Today, it’s all the buzz! I read in one source that up to 42% of leisure research on the internet today is related to genealogy (don’t know if that’s correct). To be sure, it’s become very popular, particularly since 1999, when internet resources made researching so much easier.  The largest resource for genealogical research in the world is free and is called FamilySearch:   https://familysearch.org/ It was started back in 1894. They have over 3.3 billion records and 12+billion names from over 100 countries, with over 150 million users. This is the resource I’ve been using, although there are several others out there.  My journey took me back through many lines. Some trailed off almost immediately, and some lasted hundreds of years before disappearing.

Other lines were more promising. Following various trails, I appear (perhaps)  to have descended from King Arthur,  Constantine the Great,  Joseph of Arimathea,  Hyrancus II,  Cleopatra,the Caesars,   Ptolemy V Epiphanes of Egypt (BC 210-181…the Rosetta stone describes his coronation),  Pharoah Psamteck I of Egypt,  and even back to Helen of Troy and Paris.

I was feeling a little dubious about the whole Trojan War thing (although history suggests such a battle may have occurred), but when I got to generation 80, which said I was the daughter of Zeus, and that was the end of the line…well, I disbelieved the last bit for sure. I’m not sure who was the father, but I don’t believe it was a god!  Another line from Greece back to Turkey ended after 97 generations with Simeois the River God of Acadia ben Oceanus… “son of Oceanus,” another mythological God. Hmmm.  One line from William the Conqueror went back to Halfdan the Old of Norway (whose relatives also populated Iceland). My Norwegian line goes back 52 generations to “Vifil” the Sea King and ends up after 60+ generations suggesting that I’m the offspring of Thor. Not.  My Irish line ended up being the most promising. Although it’s commonly taught that St. Patrick brought writing to the Irish in the fifth century, they apparently had a rich oral tradition of genealogies, which were recorded by professional families of historians known as senchaidh. I’m guessing it was through this source (although I’m not sure) that my lineage went back through the centuries, sometimes with only names listed, way back to the eighth century BC, where after 92 generations the record says that Princess of Judah, Tamar, Tephi ha-David Bat Josiah, was born in Jerusalem but married Eochaidh Buadhach mac Duach, the King of Ireland around 736 BC, and died in Obhdah, Meath, Ireland. Fascinating! The English do have ancient legends about “the lost tribe of Judah” and their ties to the Jewish people. Once on a London bus taking a tour of London, they played a ballad telling all about it, but it never made the least bit of sense to me until I saw this entry in the genealogical records.  As a believer, I would love to think I have some Jewish roots. That line took me back through the kings of Judah to Adam and Eve after 141 generations. The genealogy was biblically accurate, although they had left out 4 names, which would bring the total to 145 generations.  Through another line, my lineage went back to Moses and Aaron. Of course, all these lines merged at Noah and then went back through the patriarchs eventually to Adam and Eve.  Fascinating? To me, yes!! Fun? Absolutely!! How likely? Well, I absolutely believe in the validity of the biblical genealogies, and so I do believe we’re all descendants of Adam and Eve, but I reject the theory that I’m an offspring of Thor or Zeus.  🙂  I also noticed that the sources suggesting that humans sprang from gods (rather than being created by God) trailed off much earlier than the Jewish record. The Jewish narrative is by far the longest, and goes back to roughly BC 4000. This is consistent with the calculations of James Ussher…but that may have to wait until next week!

What do you think? Do you have any opinion about “In the beginning…”?

If you’ve never heard the biblical account, this is how it starts: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night.” (Genesis 1:1-5).

 

Table Mountain: One of the World’s Seven Natural Wonders

view-of-table-mountain-from-distanceIconic Table Mountain is the most beloved and photographed landmarkyellow-fynbos-edges-the-view-of-cape-town-from-table-mountain in all of South Africa. lions-head-and-long-lines-at-table-mountainEvery year more than 800,000 visitors ascend to the top (so come early)!hiking-path-up-table-mountainSome hike up the steep mountainsides, aerial-cable-car-going-up-table-mountainbut most ascend the way we did: via a revolving aerial cable way view-going-up-table-mountainwhile enjoying 360° panoramic views of Cape Town and the Atlantic Ocean. view-of-table-mountainTable Mountain is 3,563 feet at its highest point,
although the Back Table is a two-mile long, level plateau of “table top.”

aerial-cable-car-ascending-table-mountainSome geologists estimate that Table Mountain’s mesa was formed by volcanic and glacial action during the Ordovician Period some 5oo-600 million years ago, making it at least six times older than the Himalayas and one of the oldest mountains in the world. panoramic-view-of-cape-town-from-lions-head-to-devils-peakRegardless of it’s exact age, Table Mountain is ancient, and it’s the only terrestial feature on earth that has a constellation named for it: Mensa, meaning “the table,” so named by the French astronomer, Nicolas de Lacaille back in 1763 after a two-year study of 10,000 stars in the Southern Hemisphere.

plaque-on-table-mountainTable Mountain is listed as one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World. world-floral-kingdoms-at-table-mountainThe Cape Floral Kingdom is the smallest of the world’s plant kingdoms, orographic-clouds-forming-behind-lions-head-gorgeous-wildflowers-near-table-mountainbut the richest for its size, boasting 8,500 distinct species, silvery-leaved-native-species-of-plants-in-cape-peninsula1,470 of which occur on Table Mountain and the Back Table. diverse-plants-in-cape-town-and-around-table-mountainThat is more than all the plant species in the United Kingdom!yellow-fynbos-and-trails-up-table-mountainSadly, 70% of the plants are endemic (found no where else in the world), lilies-on-table-mountainand despite incessant attempts at conservation, this area also has the highest number of threatened species of any equivalently-sized continental area. visiting-the-top-of-table-mountainWe only had an hour to explore the top, but there are many hiking trails of varying lengths to experience Table Mountain’s beauty. cape-town-as-seen-from-table-mountainThere are jeep trails up the steep slopes that make first class mountain bike paths, the most famous being Plum Pudding Hill.steep-sides-of-table-mountainRock climbing and caving are also popular sports.
The largest cave is Wynberg, but over 100 caves
have been discovered in the peninsula and on Table Mountain. yellow-fynbos-and-shop-at-the-top-of-table-mountainGood maps are available, and if you decide to go exploring, be sure to buy a map, because dense mists can descend without warning any time of the year. table-cloth-spreading-over-table-mountain-saIn fact, the flat top of the mountain is notorious for being enveloped
in orographic clouds,  orographic-tablecloth-covering-table-mountainwhich are formed when the moist sea air rises to the top of the mountain
and hits colder air. alan-on-top-of-table-mountainWhile we were visiting, we were able to enjoy one of these dramatic changes orographic-clouds-forming-on-table-mountainfrom sunny to cloudy in a matter of minutes.

table-cloth-of-clouds-over-table-mountainThe locals call this effect “spreading the table cloth,” and legend has it that the foggy table cloth is caused by a smoking match between the Devil and the Dutch pirate, Van Hunks. table-cloth-clouds-on-table-mountainWhat do you think? Do you believe that legend? I’m always charmed by legends, which are known to be fictitious. I’m not so charmed by scientists who promote their theories as fact. view-of-cable-way-station-and-cape-town-from-table-mountainFor instance,  I don’t think anybody can “prove” how the world came to be. Personally, I believe God created the earth with the appearance of age. I believe each “day” was a period of time, like the word “day” is used in other passages, such as “the day of the Lord.”clouds-move-in-to-cover-table-mountain I don’t know if a “day” had 24 hours or one nanosecond or 600 million years, but I believe God spoke and it happened. Our world did not need 600+million years to evolve.clifton-beach-from-table-mountain“Nothing comes from nothing. Nothing ever could…” (as Maria Von Trapp sings). But, I don’t think our world’s beauty comes from our doing something good in our childhood or from eons of evolution, atlantic-ocean-of-cape-peninsula-saI believe the biblical account, which says that our gorgeous planet was created by God, who is the definition of goodness and omnipotence. How about you?
orographic-clouds-obscuring-view-of-cape-town-from-table-mountainIn the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.” (Genesis 1:1-5)