Tag Archives: Commentary on Song of Solomon 8:5

Rise Up, My Love (266): Jesus Christ the Apple Tree

Today as I write this, it is Christmas Eve, 2017 and the perfect time to consider our verse from the Song of Songs, because there is a beautiful old English carol that speaks of “Jesus Christ, the Apple Tree.” Do you know it?

Song of Solomon 8:5 says, “I raised thee up under the apple tree: there thy mother brought thee forth…” The bridegroom carries out the developmental nurturing of his beloved bride in the same protective environment as that which his bride had experienced during her early training. He declares, “I raised thee up under the apple tree.” Where? “Under the apple tree.” What does that mean? Does it mean that the bridegroom lets his wife live in the same community where she grew up so that she never has to move away and can always live close to her mother… “under the same apple tree?”

As pleasant a thought as that might be to some of us, that is obviously not what the bridegroom meant, because we have seen from the preceding chapters that the bride was physically drawn away to many different (and sometimes very challenging) geographical environments. So, symbolically, to what does the “apple tree” refer?

Do you remember our earlier discussion on the imagery of the apple tree from 7:8? “A composite of all the other occurrences used in Scripture depict the apple as symbolic of that which was central to one’s heart, attention, and affection, full of wisdom and discretion, joy and abundance…that which was the greatest of its type, providing delightful protection and sweet sustenance, stabilization and comfort. Could that be anything but a picture of Christ himself?”

Our family has sung in many places at Christmas time the old English carol, “Jesus Christ, the Apple Tree.” The bridegroom is declaring that in all his nurturing he used the same influences and standards as his wife had been taught from birth (and spiritually—from “rebirth!”): The gold standard—Christ and his Word. Husbands, are you raising up—lifting up—nurturing your wife under the apple tree of Christ? Are you teaching her to become more like him by living his life in your relationship with her?

Or, are you pushing her to become more like “you,” trying to force her to see things your way and live with “your liberties” and ideas of right and wrong? Don’t be guilty of expecting your wife to live by your standards, which was the condemnation of the apostate Israelites during the days of the judges: “In those days there was no king in Israel: every man did that which was right in his own eyes” (Judges 21:25).

There is a king…our Lord Jesus. He is our standard and our “apple tree.” Here it was that your wife was brought to spiritual birth, and here it is that you should continue her nurturing. As you “bring up” your wife, be sure you are using the same standard as that she was taught from her new birth: Jesus. What would Jesus do? Be as gentle as a nursing mother, providing for your wife all the very best of spiritual meat and drink…not forcing her to eat your meat and drink from your cup, but allowing her to take as she will so that together you imbibe Christ and become “flesh of his flesh and bone of his bone” (Genesis 2:23).

Rise Up, My Love (265): Like a Lamb

Song of Solomon 8:5 “I raised thee up under the apple tree: there thy mother brought thee forth: there she brought thee forth that bare thee.” Although The Song of Solomon—like all Scripture—is dealing ultimately with pictures of Christ and our relationship with him, still the settings are also based on the reality of our physical universe and played out in the actions and relationships between people. In this passage, it is the bridegroom speaking, and it is he who says, “I raised thee up under the apple tree.”  What does he mean? The verse goes on to elaborate that the “apple tree” was where the bride was brought forth by her mother, and the clarification is repeated twice, so that there can be no doubt about what he is saying. He is declaring that he raised up his bride under the same “apple tree” where his wife was brought forth by her mother. There are two wonderful lessons I have gleaned from this verse. The first is that the husband “brought up” his wife, and the second is that he carried out this development process in the same protective environment where she had experienced her early training.   Stop and let that first thought sink in for a moment!…   In this day and age of women’s “liberation” and “equal rights,” do men really think about “bringing up” their wives? Do women even want such parental nurturing from their husbands? It is not uncommon to hear a woman intimate that her husband is less controlled and mature than her children. Is that true? Is it common? I don’t know…nor do I know what men may say about their wives’ maturity level!  This I do know…that in the Song of Songs, the bridegroom—setting the example for husbands through all the generations to come—exclaims (and I think there must have been a twinge of pride in his voice) that his beloved came up from the wilderness leaning on the man she loved, and that this wonderful man (he, himself!) had “raised her up” under the same sheltering influences as were tenderly provided at the time of her birth. What touching imagery!  What wife would not thrill to be nurtured along in her growth by such a gentle “husbandman?” It reminds me of Uriah’s amazing love and devotion for his wife, Bathsheba, as portrayed by Nathan, the prophet, in his rebuke to King David. Nathan likened Uriah’s relationship with Bathsheba as the love of a man for a lamb that he had made into a pet: “But the poor man had nothing, save one little ewe lamb, which he had brought and nourished up: and it grew up together with him, and with his children; it did eat of his own meat, and drank of his own cup, and lay in his bosom, and was unto him as a daughter” (2 Samuel 12:3).   Imagine treating your wife with such tenderness: “bringing her up” and “nourishing her” so that as a couple you “grow up together” with each other and your children…loving her so much that you allow her to “eat your meat” (enjoy whatever you are taking in to feed yourself—physically, spiritually, or emotionally) and “drink from your cup”(have what she wants of all that you would use to nourish yourself…in the spiritual realm, meditate on the fact that Jesus offers us to take freely of the bread of his life and the cup of his body for our nourishment!). Do you allow your wife to “lie in your bosom”…not only in the physical sense for sexual gratification, but in the emotional sense that means so much to a woman…welcoming her into the most intimate areas of your life so that she can truly know you—heart and soul? Do you allow your wife to lie in your bosom…not simply for sexual gratification, but so that she can feel as safe and secure as a daughter resting in the protective arms of her father?   Wow! Wouldn’t you love to have a husband like that? The bridegroom continued to nurture his wife in her development with the tenderness of a mother, similar to the testimony of Paul towards his spiritual children in I Thessalonians 2:7, “But we were gentle among you, even as a nurse cherisheth her children.” What an inspiring example for husbands! (And, of course, the best example of all is Jesus, the Lamb of God, who is also our Good Shepherd!)

 

 

(Photo notes if anyone is curious: The lovely photos of sheep are from a spring stroll my husband and I took with our two youngest sons called the “Cotswold Ramble” in England a few years ago. The apple blossoms are from our lane here at Tanglewood Cottage last spring. My youngest son made the beautiful loaf of braided bread last weekend.)

 

Rise Up, My Love (263): How to Survive Heartbreak

Song of Solomon 8:5 “Who is this that cometh up from the wilderness, leaning upon her beloved?” This is a magnificent verse. It is speaking—of course—of the bride. From whence is she coming? The wilderness. How is she coming? Is she alone? No, not at all. She is coming in the company of her beloved, enabled by his support.

This is a verse that gleams like a gem lying openly atop the burning desert sands of life…no digging to understand what’s meant, just scoop it up and it’s yours! Better yet, it’s like the glitter of light reflecting from an artesian well, marking an oasis in the desert of life…no need to dig the well, just draw out the water and be refreshed. You know what the verse is saying…just meditate on it…”chew on it” for a while and allow its truth to become your own experience!

Have you ever been in the wilderness? About fifteen years ago, I lost my mother after ten long years of her suffering with Alzhiemer’s, and shortly thereafter I learned that one of my dearest friends had betrayed me in a most devastating way. I felt desperately lonely and heartbroken…I believe it was the lowest point in my life, and my husband was totally unhelpful. (He is now very supportive, just for the record.)  At any rate, it took me many years, but I learned a very painful lesson. When we’re in the desert, we’re never going to survive unless we start taking one small step at a time…putting one foot in front of the other even if we’d really rather die and go to heaven. Nobody can do this for us. God wants us to lean on our Savior and walk out of the wilderness with him, but there are certain steps we have to take or we’ll never really get out.

*We have to confess our own failures: “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (I John 1:9).

*We have to forgive those who’ve injured us: “For if ye forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you: But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses” (Matthew 6:14-15).

*And then, we have to consciously refuse to think about the past hurt, just as our dear heavenly Father does: “And they shall teach no more every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for they shall all know me, from the least of them unto the greatest of them, saith the Lord: for I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more” (Jeremiah 31:34).  *Finally, we have to start walking up and out of the wilderness, like someone who’s trying to recover from a broken leg (or for us older folks—a hip or knee replacement), leaning heavily on our beloved spiritual husband, Jesus Christ, for support. Slowly but surely, without even realizing it, we’ll start to heal and find joy again, but it comes from leaning on Jesus and communing with him with an iron-clad resolution to refuse looking back.

Will you take time to stop for a few minutes and sort through your life relationships? Are there injuries that rumble like thunder through the back of your mind and send a bolt of jagged pain ripping through your heart when you remember them? If so, how about taking a few moments to visualize something with me. Imagine gathering up all these terrible memories one by one as if they are billowing black clouds that you can reach up and pull down into a bundle. Imagine taking the bundle and bringing it to the foot of the cross, giving it entirely to Jesus so that it is no longer yours. Confess and forgive: “And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil” (Luke 11:4).

Have you given your burden to the Lord? If so, it is his. You don’t own it any more. Don’t try to take it back; don’t open the bag; don’t try to sort through the memories anymore. They belong to Jesus, and he wants you to choose to “remember them no more.” That chapter is finished. Over. Done. Look forward.

One night while our family was leading worship at our local rescue mission, a big, handsome, fierce-looking African-American man with dread locks came to the front of the room at an altar call carrying a long knife, which he lifted over his head, holding one end with each of his hands. For a moment we all held our breath, not perfectly sure what he intended, because carrying concealed weapons was strictly forbidden at the mission, and no one had known that he was armed with such a deadly knife.

However, when the man reached the front where my husband was standing, he kneeled down and laid his weapon on the floor. This is just what we need to do with those killer thoughts that we’ve kept hidden within us! Lift that lethal bundle over your head, come straight to the cross, and lay it at the feet of Jesus.

“This is the rest wherewith ye may cause the weary to rest; and this is the refreshing” (Isaiah 28:12). “Casting all your care upon him: for He careth for you” (I Peter 5:7).