Rise Up, My Love (265): Like a Lamb

Song of Solomon 8:5 “I raised thee up under the apple tree: there thy mother brought thee forth: there she brought thee forth that bare thee.” Although The Song of Solomon—like all Scripture—is dealing ultimately with pictures of Christ and our relationship with him, still the settings are also based on the reality of our physical universe and played out in the actions and relationships between people. In this passage, it is the bridegroom speaking, and it is he who says, “I raised thee up under the apple tree.”  What does he mean? The verse goes on to elaborate that the “apple tree” was where the bride was brought forth by her mother, and the clarification is repeated twice, so that there can be no doubt about what he is saying. He is declaring that he raised up his bride under the same “apple tree” where his wife was brought forth by her mother. There are two wonderful lessons I have gleaned from this verse. The first is that the husband “brought up” his wife, and the second is that he carried out this development process in the same protective environment where she had experienced her early training.   Stop and let that first thought sink in for a moment!…   In this day and age of women’s “liberation” and “equal rights,” do men really think about “bringing up” their wives? Do women even want such parental nurturing from their husbands? It is not uncommon to hear a woman intimate that her husband is less controlled and mature than her children. Is that true? Is it common? I don’t know…nor do I know what men may say about their wives’ maturity level!  This I do know…that in the Song of Songs, the bridegroom—setting the example for husbands through all the generations to come—exclaims (and I think there must have been a twinge of pride in his voice) that his beloved came up from the wilderness leaning on the man she loved, and that this wonderful man (he, himself!) had “raised her up” under the same sheltering influences as were tenderly provided at the time of her birth. What touching imagery!  What wife would not thrill to be nurtured along in her growth by such a gentle “husbandman?” It reminds me of Uriah’s amazing love and devotion for his wife, Bathsheba, as portrayed by Nathan, the prophet, in his rebuke to King David. Nathan likened Uriah’s relationship with Bathsheba as the love of a man for a lamb that he had made into a pet: “But the poor man had nothing, save one little ewe lamb, which he had brought and nourished up: and it grew up together with him, and with his children; it did eat of his own meat, and drank of his own cup, and lay in his bosom, and was unto him as a daughter” (2 Samuel 12:3).   Imagine treating your wife with such tenderness: “bringing her up” and “nourishing her” so that as a couple you “grow up together” with each other and your children…loving her so much that you allow her to “eat your meat” (enjoy whatever you are taking in to feed yourself—physically, spiritually, or emotionally) and “drink from your cup”(have what she wants of all that you would use to nourish yourself…in the spiritual realm, meditate on the fact that Jesus offers us to take freely of the bread of his life and the cup of his body for our nourishment!). Do you allow your wife to “lie in your bosom”…not only in the physical sense for sexual gratification, but in the emotional sense that means so much to a woman…welcoming her into the most intimate areas of your life so that she can truly know you—heart and soul? Do you allow your wife to lie in your bosom…not simply for sexual gratification, but so that she can feel as safe and secure as a daughter resting in the protective arms of her father?   Wow! Wouldn’t you love to have a husband like that? The bridegroom continued to nurture his wife in her development with the tenderness of a mother, similar to the testimony of Paul towards his spiritual children in I Thessalonians 2:7, “But we were gentle among you, even as a nurse cherisheth her children.” What an inspiring example for husbands! (And, of course, the best example of all is Jesus, the Lamb of God, who is also our Good Shepherd!)

 

 

(Photo notes if anyone is curious: The lovely photos of sheep are from a spring stroll my husband and I took with our two youngest sons called the “Cotswold Ramble” in England a few years ago. The apple blossoms are from our lane here at Tanglewood Cottage last spring. My youngest son made the beautiful loaf of braided bread last weekend.)

 

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