Pączki and a Recipe for Cookie Monsters: Dealing with Holidays

paczki-4-packDid you celebrate Fat Tuesday? I’m not sure why, but in Grand Rapids (which has Dutch roots), the traditional special treat are pączki (pronounced “punch key”). My guess is that this yummy tradition has drifted west from Detroit’s once large Polish community, Hamtramck. fat-tuesday-breakfastThis year for the first time, we enjoyed pączki for breakfast on Fat Tuesday.  Pączki are amazingly delicious, deep-fried doughnuts filled with fruit or custard. malasadas-in-kauai-hawaiiPączki have been a Polish delicacy since the Middle Ages, and they are similar to American bismarcks, German berliners, or my much loved Portuguese treat (which we’ve found only in Hawaii): Malasadas. paczkisHowever, pączki may be even richer; they often contain eggs, sugar, yeast, milk, fats, a touch of alcohol and are glazed or sprinkled with sugar. One theory on the development of this tradition was that the Christians were using up their stores of special ingredients before beginning the Lenten fast.

Which brings me to Ash Wednesday. Did you celebrate Ash Wednesday?  I think Ash Wednesday has some similarities to the Jewish Yom Kippur, the “Day of Atonement.” Both holy days focus on personal reflection, repentance, and the need for atonement through the sacrificial blood of a lamb (the Lamb, for Christians).  Recently I noticed afresh what the signs of true repentance are while reading the New International Version of 2 Corinthians 7:10-11: Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation and leaves no regret, but worldly sorrow brings death. See what this godly sorrow has produced in you: what earnestness, what eagerness to clear yourselves, what indignation, what alarm, what longing, what concern, what readiness to see justice done. At every point you have proved yourselves to be innocent in this matter.That’s a weighty list, and I’ve been continuing to examine myself so that I might experience more true repentance over sin.  brothers-and-sonDoes true repentance mean that I am in a constant state of mourning and can never enjoy life? Not at all! Many Christians observe a 40-day “Lenten Season” in which we fast from something we normally enjoy in order to focus more on God and identify in some small way with the sufferings of Christ, but that doesn’t mean we fast forever or never celebrate holidays! Thankfully, the Lenten fast culminates in remembering the death of Christ on Good Friday and ends on Easter Sunday, when we celebrate the resurrection of Christ: “Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world” (John 1:29).party-time-for-small-boy I hope you’re able to observe times of fasting as well as times of feasting, because God condones both.small-boy-opening-cardOn Saturdays, I’ve been sharing recipes, and this week I want to share a recipe for one of our favorite treats, although I have to admit I served it before Lent started and won’t be serving it again until after Lent is over!cookie-monsters-for-dessert                                             Chocolate Chip Cookie Monsters

Bake big chocolate chip cookies (your favorite recipe) and place in individual bowls.

Add a scoop of your favorite ice cream

Top with hot fudge sauce. If you don’t have any on hand, here’s a great recipe:

1 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup butter (oleo works but doesn’t taste as good)
1/3 cup milk (you can use cream, but milk works fine)
2 T. (tablespoons) dark cocoa powder
Pinch of salt (optional)

Throw all the ingredients for the hot fudge sauce in a pan and cook until the soft ball stage, stirring faithfully so nothing sticks on the bottom. Allow it to cool slightly so it’s good and thick, serve it up with your favorite ice cream, and be sure to put plenty of whipping cream on top (plus a cherry or whatever your kids love). Enjoy, but don’t overeat!  🙂  chocolate-chip-cookie-monstersCharge them that are rich in this world, that they be not highminded, nor trust in uncertain riches, but in the living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy” (1 Timothy 6:17).

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